October 18th, 2015
12:38 PM ET

President Kenyatta on gay rights in Kenya

On today’s FAREED ZAKARIA GPS (10:00am and 1:00pm in North America) Kenya's President Uhuru Kenyatta spoke about domestic homeland security and the state of rights for homosexuals in Kenya.

MANDATORY CREDIT for reference and usage: “CNN’s FAREED ZAKARIA GPS”



FAREED ZAKARIA, HOST:  The East African nation of Kenya has seen great highs and great lows of late. In April, Al Shabaab militants stormed across the porous border from Somalia and killed almost 150 people at a Kenyan university. That followed the infamous Westgate Mall siege – also by Al Shabaab – that killed 67 people and lasted 4 days. In July, President Obama made his first trip as President to his father's native land. In the weeks leading up the President's arrival, the U.S. conducted drone strikes against Al Shabaab in their sanctuary of Somalia. I recently had the chance to sit down with Kenya's President Uhuru Kenyatta to discuss terror, economics, and playing host to President Obama.

ZAKARIA: President Kenyatta, pleasure to have you on.


ZAKARIA: Let's talk first about terrorism. The world has been astonished over the last few years to see the rise of – first it was Al Qaeda type affiliates, now it appears to be ISIS type affiliates in Africa, Why is this happening?

KENYATTA: I think the best way to put this is that this is really, this is an argument I've been putting, this is not really a Kenyan situation. You've first of all got to recognize the neighborhood that we live in. You know we had a failed state right next to our border, a state where there was no rule of law, there was no government, it was just open vastland. So when Al Qaeda sort of took root and they didn't take root in Kenya, they found in Somalia, a haven where they could do their training, they could do almost anything.

ZAKARIA: You must have studied though this issue of why some Muslims get radicalized because you have a Muslim population in Kenya and some have gotten radicalized. You must look at Boko Haram in Nigeria and think about the same thing.  What is the answer? What is – what seems to be attractive to young men particularly?

KENYATTA: One let's put it that first and foremost let's say that there may be genuine grievances, they may have.

But then on top of it you've got this group of radical preachers who come and give a very warped view of religion you know at Friday – at Friday Mosque. You know start telling them that what you're doing you know you're doing for god, you're doing for you know, it's for your religion and for God, right?

Now this is what we've really got to focus ourselves on. You know how do you make this not so attractive? We got to start creating the Muslim leadership in the world to start saying “no” Boko Haram, Al-Shabaab, Al-Qaeda do not represent the true faith; this is the true faith.

ZAKARIA: Let me ask you about economics. For a while Africa was seen as this great hope but a lot of investors I talk to and a lot of businessmen say much of the reform that they had hoped would take place in Africa has stalled.

Because at the – you know between corruption and dysfunction and bad government there is still so much of it in Africa that it's blocking progress. Would you agree with that?

KENYATTA: I would look at it differently. I would look at it and say that the African renaissance is still on. I would say that yes indeed we do have challenges and challenges have been there. There is actual true realization that we need to reform our system to match the growth and to sustain the growth trajectory that we've taken.

This is why Kenyans chose for themselves a new constitution in 2010 that sought to reorganize the way we manage our business as a country. That's why they removed certain powers from the President, and gave them to independent institutions to remove that personality driven cult that one man controls the entire system.  And I believe this is working.

ZAKARIA: But people still say you are supremely powerful, you personally.

KENYATTA: Well I don't know about supremely powerful but if you – if you actually look at the situation that we have today in Kenya and compare it to where we were before that is actually you know not the case. I have no power to appoint or fire judges any more. Really my role is more or less an understand of saying that whatever the commission does you know the judiciary has gained its independence.

The same applies to the legislature. Now where the issue of power comes from is where they say oh but you control Parliament. But yes it's true, we have a majority in Parliament, we have that majority because the people chose to give that majority to the party to which I belong to.

ZAKARIA: When people talk about gay rights to you and President Obama did this on his visit there. You say look, we have our culture we have our traditions, don't try to impose your values on us. The problem for many in the west is that it's not really seen as a matter of cultural values it's seen as a matter of innate human rights that these people are – you know that you are in effect depriving people of their rights merely because of something that is God-given. That is – that they were born with, that there is increasing scientific evidence that this is the case. And why would you persecute people for something that they have ultimately no control over?

KENYATTA: Let me make it clear to you and put it this way, right. I think first and foremost we're all saying that whatever society you come from right, the principal aim is that you must give the people you know their right to choose, all right?

Now where we are and at the level of development that we are in, I am not saying that these people don't have their rights, that's not what I'm saying. I am just saying that the majority – the majority in our society yes, do not wish to legalize, yes, this issue of gay rights.

ZAKARIA: Can you persuade them?

KENYATTA: The people in Kenya are not, at this point in time, and that's exactly what I said when we were with President Obama, yes. To them this is not an issue that they are going to put at the center. They have more pressing issues.

However, that said and done I am also, right, and will not allow people to persecute any individuals yes. Or just to beat them, or to you know torture them, you know.

ZAKARIA: But you do allow persecution because they're – because they're criminalized.

KENYATTA: What I'm saying witch hunts - what I am saying is witch hunts. You know we won't allow people to take the law into their own hands and harass and no we won't. All right. Every individual has a right to be protected by the law and that's stated in our constitution, all right.

But what we are saying is that as a society, right, we do not accept some of these values, right. And this is where I am saying we have to get synergies. You’re not going to create the United States or Great Britain or the Netherlands in Kenya, or in Nigeria or Senegal overnight. We have to understand that these are processes and they take time.

ZAKARIA: President Kenyatta, pleasure to have you on.

KENYATTA: Been great.


October 11th, 2015
01:17 PM ET

#FZGPS: America's TPP deal negotiator responds to 2016ers' criticism – "We're convinced it's a very high standard deal"

Sunday’s FAREED ZAKARIA GPS on CNN/U.S. features an exclusive interview with U.S. Trade Representative Michael Froman who led the American negotiations for the Trans-Pacific Partnership deal between the U.S. and 11 Asian and North American nations of the Pacific Rim – an estimated 40 percent of the global economy. They discussed the logistics, the politics, and the next steps for ‘the TPP,’ and what the deal means for American jobs and the global economy.  This interview aired in its entirety on Sunday, October 11, 2015 at 10am &1pm ET on CNN/U.S.:

MANDATORY CREDIT for reference and usage: “CNN’s FAREED ZAKARIA GPS”



FAREED ZAKARIA, HOST:  Some say it is a cornerstone foreign policy accomplishment for the Obama administration. But the president's former Secretary of State came out against it this week. I'm not talking about the Iran nuclear deal, but about something called the Trans-Pacific Partnership. It is a massive trade deal negotiated by the United States with 11 different nations comprising 40 percent of the global economy.

So why is Mrs. Clinton now against something that, according to CNN's count, she has pushed 45 times in the past publicly? And if it's such a great deal, why is the administration being secretive about the details?

We will get to all of that with my next guest, the man who oversaw the deal, the United States Trade Representative, Michael Froman.

Mike, nice to have you on.


ZAKARIA: First, 11 nations, this took six years - it's quite an accomplishment. And I've got to ask you, what is the key to getting a deal of this magnitude? What did you learn about negotiating?

FROMAN: Well, I think it took a lot of persistence by all 12 countries working together to reach an agreement that's going to create jobs and increase wages and promote growth across the whole region.

ZAKARIA: It was six years in the making. During a good bit of that time, the Secretary of State you were dealing with was Hillary Clinton. Publicly she supported it, as we point out, 45 times. Was she very supportive privately, as well?

FROMAN: I won't comment on presidential politics, just to say that we're all focused on making sure that through this agreement we can level the playing field and open markets for our exports.

ZAKARIA: But you must have been surprised by her opposition.

FROMAN: Well, again, I think the key thing is to focus on having the deal on the table, having people have a chance to read it, to get into the details, so that they can make a judgment about it.

We're convinced it's a very high-standard deal. It opens markets around the world. It eliminates 18,000 taxes on U.S. exports. It raises labor and environmental standards around the world. It establishes new disciplines on new challenges in the global economy, all of which reflect American interests and American values.

So I'm convinced as the people sit down and take the time to go through it in detail, that they'll come to a positive judgment.

ZAKARIA: So if this is such a good deal, why is it all secret?

FROMAN: Well, you know, it's not all secret. We've put out a lot of information about it along the way, and we're looking forward to getting the text released as soon as possible. The lawyers are working right now to finalize the text and to prepare it for release. We hope to get it out within the next 30 days.

But throughout, it's an international negotiation, and you've got to have some ability to negotiate discreetly with other parties to get to the best possible outcome for American interests. And that's what we've done.

ZAKARIA: And what do you say to people like Bernie Sanders and Donald Trump, who say the result of these kind of agreements is Americans - American jobs get shipped overseas?

FROMAN: Well, we've got 95 percent of all the world's consumers living outside the United States. And some of these are the fastest growing and largest economies in the world.

Asia, the Asia-Pacific region, will have three billion middle class consumers in the next 15 years, and for us to be successful, for us to keep businesses here, to manufacture, to grow things here and ship them abroad, we need access to those markets. That's how we're going to grow good paying jobs here in the United States.

We know that export-related jobs pay up to 18 percent more, on average, than non-export-related jobs. So if we can tear down these barriers, level the playing field, increase our exports, we're going to lead to more good paying jobs here in the United States.

ZAKARIA: And the overarching strategic idea, as you say, is this pivot to Asia, to focus on Asia, to make sure that China does not, as the President has said, write the new rules of international trade and commerce.  So there's a very strong foreign policy component to this.  And the pivot to Asia was, of course, something strongly supported by Hillary Clinton when she was Secretary of State. Do you hope that a President Clinton would follow through on a policy that she was very much part of creating?

FROMAN: Well, I think this is a key part of the rebalancing towards Asia strategy.  It's one of the most concrete manifestations of that policy. And it underscores that the United States is a Pacific power, that we’re going to be involved in the region, and that our partners in the region very much want us to be embedded with them, economically and strategically.

And I think the logic of that will continue to hold going forward.

ZAKARIA: Could China see this as a kind of containment strategy? The United States is ganging up with all its allies and trying to, in some way, shut China out?

FROMAN: TPP is not directed against any country, including China. It is directed at establishing high standards for the region, rules of the road that reflect our interests and our values. And it's meant to encourage other countries to raise their game as well. You know, we already have countries who’ve contacted us, who want to be considered for the next tranche of TPP partners. And we expect that more countries will join over time if they are able and willing to meet the high standards of the agreement.

ZAKARIA: Michael Froman, the man who negotiated the TPP. Thank you.

FROMAN: Thanks for having me.



October 4th, 2015
03:09 PM ET

Fareed Zakaria GPS: Benjamin Netanyahu on Russia, Iran, U.S.

On today's FAREED ZAKARIA GPS Israel's Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, who was in New York for the opening of United Nations General Assembly debate, discussed Israel’s relationships with the United States and Russia, Ukraine, the civil war inside Syria, and Israel’s opposition to the P5 + 1 nuclear deal with Iran – including his reaction to former President Clinton’s assessment of his Congressional speech as ‘unprecedented.’

MANDATORY CREDIT for reference and usage: “CNN’s FAREED ZAKARIA GPS”


Israel’s Prime Minister Netanyahu on Russia's actions inside Syria

Netanyahu on Palestinian Prime Minister Abbas’ statements rejecting the Oslo Accords – and his son’s calls for citizenship rights

Netanyahu’s reaction to former President Clinton’s assessment of his ‘unprecedented’ Congressional speech



Fareed Zakaria, host, Fareed Zakaria GPS:  Israel’s Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu was in New York this week to deliver a fiery speech on Thursday to the UN General Assembly.

On Friday, I sat down with him to talk about many topics, all hot buttons at the UN this week: Syria, ISIS, the Iran nuclear deal, and the future of Middle East peace.

Prime Minister, pleasure to have you on.

BENJAMIN NETANYAHU, PRIME MINISTER of ISRAEL:  Good to be back with you, Fareed.

ZAKARIA:   You have painted often a situation that Israel faces that is pretty tough, but I'm now looking at what's going on in Syria and I see Iran all in to try to defend the Assad regime; I see Hezbollah strained, stressed - there are reports that they've lost hundreds, maybe thousands of fighters. Iranian militias are mired there, fighting against ISIS.

Aren't your enemies drained and bleeding right now? Doesn't that give you some space in security terms?

NETANYAHU: Well, that's not exactly what we see. What I see is Iran pushing into Lebanon, into Hezbollah as they’re fighting for Assad; they’re putting inside Lebanon the most devastating weapons on Earth. They’re trying to turn Iran’s rockets that they supplied Hezbollah into precision-guided missiles that can hit any spot in Israel. Hezbollah is putting in SA-22 anti-aircraft missiles that can shoot down our planes, Yakhont anti-ship missiles that can shoot down our gas rigs. That's what we're seeing. And we see Iran trying to establish a second front with Iranian generals in the Golan Heights against Israel.

So we see a different picture. And I've made it very clear what our policy in Syria is. I haven’t intervened in the Syrian internal conflict. But I've said that if anybody wants to use Syrian territory to attack us, we'll take action. If anybody is trying to build a second front against Israel from the Golan, we'll take action. And if anybody wants to use Syrian territory to transfer nuclear weapons to Hezbollah, we'll take action. And we continue to do that.

ZAKARIA: Donald Trump says between Assad and ISIS, he thinks Assad is better. Is Assad better for Israel?

NETANYAHU: Look, I don't know who's better. You know what you have there in Syria, you've got - you've got Assad, you've got Iran, you've got Hezbollah, you've got Daesh, ISIS. You've got these rebels and those rebels. And now you've got Russia. Do you know what's better? I don't know. I know what I have to do to protect the security of Israel.

And the thing that I do is I draw red lines and any time we have the intel, we just keep them. We do not let those actions of aggression against Israel go unpunished.

ZAKARIA: Do you think that Russia's involvement is potentially stabilizing or destabilizing?

NETANYAHU: I don't know. I think time will tell. But I did go to Moscow and spoke very candidly to President Putin and just told him exactly what I just told you. I said these are our policies. We don't want to go back to the days when, you know, Russia and Israel were in an adversarial position. I think we've changed the relationship. And it's, on the whole, good. It's not like the one we have with the United States. Nothing will ever equal that.

But we certainly don't want an adversarial relationship. So we agreed that in a few days’ time, our deputy chiefs of staff will meet to arrange deconfliction - to make sure that we don't bump into Iran. We have different goals. In Syria, I've defined my goals. They're to protect the security of my people and my country. Russia has different goals. But they shouldn't clash.

ZAKARIA: You are a man who has often spoken out against aggression, against, you know - particularly against small countries. One place you have been studiously quiet is Russia's - what many people call aggression against Crimea. And when you were asked about it, you said, well, I've got a lot on my plate. But you are an international statesman. What is your view of what Russia, what Vladimir Putin did in annexing Crimea?

NETANYAHU: We went along with the provisions that the American government put forward. I mean it's very clear we don't approve of this Russian action. But I think we're also cognizant of the fact that we have a - we're bordering Russia right now.

And we are - Israel is a strong country. It's a small strong country. But we also know that we have to make sure that we don't get into unnecessary conflicts. And we have - believe me, we have a lot on our plate. I went to Moscow to make it clear that we should avoid a clash between Russian forces and Israeli forces. That's about as responsible, I think, and statesmanly as I think we should act at this point.

ZAKARIA: What's your view of Putin?

NETANYAHU: Look, there's mutual respect, but that doesn't mean that we have mutual coherence of interests. It's not - it's not the relationship that we have with the United States of America. It never can be. But I think it's important that we make every effort right now to avoid a concussion.


ZAKARIA: When we come back, I will ask Prime Minister Netanyahu, the Iran nuclear deal’s biggest opponent, what if any options he has left.


ZAKARIA: Back now to more of my interview with Israel’s Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, who was in New York this week for the UN General Assembly. ///

ZAKARIA: Prime Minister, let me show you a chart. You presented a graphic when you came to the UN, and you detailed exactly what was dangerous about Iran's quest to enrich uranium. And you said this was the key - how much enriched uranium they had. And you drew a line. So I'm going to show you this - this was the - the line you put. This is a chart put out by the White House. And they say, you are right, that Iran was at this point, the red line that you described. But, they say, with this deal, before the sanctions are lifted, Iran has to destroy 98 percent of its enriched uranium; of course, the plutonium pathway, which is the most common way, is blocked, and that the line would have to be drawn way down here.

So I'm asking you, are they right?

NETANYAHU: Look, I'm not going to rehash the deal. I summarized yesterday our main opposition. I didn’t go into the question of centrifuges or R&D or inspections…
ZAKARIA: But are they right? This seems to me - I mean, I asked experts, and they said, yes, if Iran does in the first year before the sanctions are lifted, what it is required to do, it goes - it goes way down.

NETANYAHU: Well, there are a lot of questions that will remain open on this question. But there's one that isn't, and that is that after year 10 and after year 15, all these limitations are lifted. And therefore, Iran will be free to get to the point where it's at the threshold level of producing the fissile material, the nuclear - the indispensable nuclear material, through enrichment, to make an arsenal of nuclear bombs.

ZAKARIA: But they're there right now, as per Bibi Netanyahu's speech two years ago.

NETANYAHU: But they were - but they were held back because of biting sanctions that are now going to be removed.

So I don't want to rehash this. And I was very clear about that. I didn't go into the details. I said, OK, now that it's done, let's look forward. Let's keep Iran's feet to the fire. Let's make sure that they keep all their obligations under the nuclear deal. That's the first thing.

Second thing - let's block Iran's other aggression in the region, because they're doing everything. They're trying to encircle Israel with a noose of death. They're sending weapons to the Houthis. They're in Iraq. They're in Afghanistan. They're all over the place. In Yemen, of course. Let's bolster those forces to stand up to Iran's aggression in the region, and none is stronger, none is more reliable than Israel. So I look forward to discussing President Obama's offer to bolster Israel's security when I visit the United States in November.

And the third thing I said - and I drew attention to something that is not well known - let's tear down Iran's global terror network. They're in over 30 countries. They're establishing terror cells in the Western Hemisphere alongside the Eastern Hemisphere. These are things that we agree on.

Yes, we had a disagreement in the family, as President Obama and I both said. But we have no disagreement about blocking Iran's aggression and working against its terrorism. And I think that's what we should focus on now.

ZAKARIA: Last week, Bill Clinton, on this program, said that he thought your speech to the United States Congress at the invitation of John Boehner was unprecedented. And I asked him then, was it unwise? He said, you'll have to ask Prime Minister Netanyahu that.

Was it unwise?

NETANYAHU: I'll ask you a question. If the President of the United States thought that a deal was being forged that would endanger the security and even the very survival of the United States, wouldn't you expect him to speak up at every place, at every forum?

And the answer is, of course you would. That was my obligation. Again, I don't think that we should rehash this. But I think we should focus on what we do agree must be done right now.

President Obama was - called me up at the time that the deal was being debated. And he said, I'd like to talk to you about bolstering Israel's security, about maintaining its qualitative military edge, about preventing things from going into Iran's proxies. Would you like to do that now, or would you like to do it later? And I said I'd like to do it later, the day after.

Well, today in my conversation with John Kerry, this is the day after. And we began that conversation. Our secretary - our minister of defense will be coming to Washington to meet Secretary Carter in a few weeks. And after that, I'll meet President Obama.

I look forward to discussing this with the President. I think it's a very important stage to help us face the challenges that we face.

ZAKARIA: If two years from now, Iran has, in fact, destroyed 98 percent of its en - highly enriched uranium, if the Fordow and Arak facilities have been rendered inoperable, will you call President Obama and say, you know what, maybe this worked a little better than I thought it did?

NETANYAHU: I'll be the happiest person in the world if my concerns prove to be wrong. I - you know, the opposite could also happen, you know.

But I think the issue right now is - it's a practical question right now. It's not an ideological question. It's not a political question. It's a practical question - do they keep the agreement?

And second, what happens 15 years from now, or 10 years from now, when they're basically absolved of any restrictions, which is the main point I've been making. Because, see, they get all these restrictions lifted regardless of their policy. If they continue their aggression...

ZAKARIA: But you get 15 years with no nuclear - with a non-nuclear Iran.

NETANYAHU: Well, assuming they don't cheat.


NETANYAHU: And second, you're also assuming that they would have gone on and continued in the face of very strong sanctions and a military threat. We can - we can argue that. But that's not my purpose now.

My purpose is to focus on what we do agree on. And we absolutely agree on the need to block Iran's aggression in the region. That was never part of the deal - that you let them have a free reign. And the second thing is how to bolster Israel's security, and, by the way, other allies that are facing this same Iranian threat.

And I'd also draw attention to their global terror network. That - these are things that we can concentrate on, and we agree on, and we should cooperate on, and we will cooperate on.  ///

ZAKARIA: When we come back, did any lingering hopes for Middle East peace just blow up at the UN this week? I’ll ask the Prime Minister when we come back.


ZAKARIA: Prime Minister, you know that the Palestinian leader Mahmoud Abbas has said that he is essentially not going to follow the Oslo process - they will not abide by it any more. You mentioned it in your speech. I want to ask you, since it does feel like the peace process is dead, you know, if it ever had much life in it, about his son. There have been reports…


ZAKARIA: His son has - there are a couple of reports which talked about - a New York Times report, where he gave an interview, and he said, I'm not for my father's plan. I think the peace process is dead. I don't want a two-state solution. I want a one-state solution. I just want rights. I just want political rights. If you're not going to give me a state, give me political rights.

You know that there are other Palestinians who feel this way. In fact, there's Khalil Shikaki, a pollster, who say about a third of Palestinians now, and it is more for younger Palestinians, want just political rights. Will they get them?

NETANYAHU: Well, I think that the right solution is a demilitarized Palestinian state that recognizes the Jewish state. They want a Palestinian state; we have a Jewish state. We should have mutual recognition of these two nation states and provisions on the ground by which Israel can defend itself by itself. And I think that's eminently preferable to the idea of a unitary state, which I don't want.

I think the reason the peace process doesn't get - doesn't move forward is because the Palestinians have basically two provisions there. I mean, one is you've got to renounce terrorism and act against it. And unfortunately, that's not what they're doing. We just had, you know, a young mother and a young father brutally murdered by Palestinian terrorists - four little orphans in the back of the car. And President Abbas has yet to denounce this.

I mean, on the rare occasions that we have - and we do have, on certain occasions, acts of terrorism by Jews, we always go there like gangbusters. We condemn it. We do everything we can to find them and to fight them.

I expect President Abbas to do the same. So one is, you have to stop this incitement against Israel, because incitement leads to acts of terrorism. But the second thing is you've got to stay in the process. You've got to come and sit on the table.

ZAKARIA: Why not use this opportunity to make a bold counter offer, not just a process one, but an actual proposal for a Palestinian state?

NETANYAHU: Well, I've made several offers, but, you know, the only way - his offers and my offers obviously don't cohere - and I said, look, the only way you're going to do this is let's sit around the table. Here's the litmus test for you…

ZAKARIA: But he says the problem is you're building settlements, even in…

NETANYAHU: Well, I, you know…

ZAKARIA: - even in Area C…

NETANYAHU: - I think the problem is he's inciting terrorism. I think the problem is he's spreading lies about the Temple Mount and what we're doing there. We're the guardians of the Temple Mount - for God's sake, without Israel, you know, what’ll happen on those sacred sites would be what happened in Palmyra in Syria.


NETANYAHU: But he - so I have complaints; he has complaints. There's only one way to get a peace process going, peace negotiations going - you've got to sit down and negotiate.

Yet in the seven years that I've been now in - sitting in the prime minister's office in Israel, we haven't had seven hours that he was willing to talk. And it's not because of me. The fact is, I'm willing to have this conversation. He's not.

ZAKARIA: Well he says you're creating facts on the ground...

NETANYAHU: Well so is he…

ZAKARIA: - by building settlements.

NETANYAHU: So is he. He's creating a lot of facts on the ground, and bad facts.

ZAKARIA: - OK, a last question.

You talked about terrorism against Palestinians, terrorism by Israelis. President - the president of Israel says - wonders - he posed this question, why is this culture of extremism flourishing in Israel right now? Do you think that there is an atmosphere that has - that has incited or allowed this kind of extremism to flourish?

NETANYAHU: No, I think the test is not whether societies have extremists; the question is what do the - what does the mainstream do about it. In our case, we go wild against them. Every part of our society unites against any example of terrorism in our midst.

But what I say in Ramallah is that President Abbas calls public squares in honor of mass murderers. And that's unfortunate - that's not - it's a tragedy, I think - for us and the Palestinians, too. The culture of peace, the culture of acceptance, a culture of diversity, you know, for women, for Christians, for gays and so on, is very much ingrained in our culture. And that's why we don't educate our people that we have to destroy the Palestinian. We want peace with the Palestinians. But for that, we have to sit down. And I think that's one order of the day.

And the other order of the day is what I said before. I think we have to protect ourselves against the rising tide of militant Islam - religious fanaticism that is threatening all of us. And Israel is there. It's standing in the breach. And I appreciate the fact that despite our disagreement on the Iran nuclear deal, both the supporters of the deal and the opponents of the deal, those who supported it, those who oppose it, they all agree now we have to strengthen Israel.

And I think that's the best guarantor of peace.

ZAKARIA: Prime Minister Netanyahu, thank you so much.

NETANYAHU: Thank you.  Thank you, Fareed.

### END ###

Topics: CNN • CNN International • Fareed Zakaria • Fareed Zakaria GPS • Iran • Israel • Russia • Syria • Ukraine
October 4th, 2015
12:59 PM ET

Fareed Zakaria GPS: Renzi, Clinton, Soros on Europe's refugee crisis, economic woes

Today's CNN’s FAREED ZAKARIA GPS featured a panel interview with Italian Prime Minister Matteo Renzi, former President Bill Clinton, and philanthropist George Soros (Soros Fund Management) about during a session of the 2015 Clinton Global Initiative meetings in New York City.  Their discussion focused on Europe’s refugee crisis and enduring economic woes.

MANDATORY CREDIT for reference and usage: “CNN’s FAREED ZAKARIA GPS”



Fareed Zakaria, host, Fareed Zakaria GPS:  I have a real treat for you now: an all-star panel having a blockbuster discussion on Europe at the Clinton Global Initiative this week.

Joining President Clinton himself was the man who has been called Italy’s Bill Clinton, Prime Minister Matteo Renzi, and the billionaire businessman and philanthropist George Soros.

It was a terrific, wide-ranging conversation. I want to show you the best parts.  I started off by asking Soros for an overall analysis of just how bad things look in Europe today.


GEORGE SOROS, FOUNDER, SOROS FUND MANAGEMENT: Unfortunately, Europe is in a state of disintegration. It started in 2008, and it continues to progress, and it's actually become non-linear. The disintegration in the last two months has accelerated because you've got not one crisis but multiple - at least five or six crises.

ZAKARIA: What are the main ones?

SOROS: Well...

ZAKARIA: Describe the disintegration.

SOROS: –you start with the euro crisis, which is at the root of it all. It came to fruition in the Greek crisis at the beginning of 2010. Then you have the Ukrainian situation and, of course, now, the migration crisis. And the most important thing, of course, is that there is also an external threat, namely from Putin's Russia. And the internal threats, or crises, are dividing Europe. This external threat ought to unite Europe, because everybody has to pull together to resist and to stand up to it.


ZAKARIA: The rising Russian bear on Europe’s borders and growling in so many different directions – I asked Prime Minister Matteo Renzi if Russian threats would cause Europe to find some common ground and common identity and coalesce and unite.


MATTEO RENZI, ITALIAN PRIME MINISTER: I think it could be a tragic mistake consider identity of Europe against Russia. I think we must defend integrity and the sovereignty of Ukraine. I think we must continue in a correct support to Poroshenko's government.

But if we think the future of Europe is create an identity, not in our values and our ideals, but against Russia, I think this is a tragic mistake.

First, because I think we must involve Russia in every dossier - in Syria, in Libya, Mediterranean. Second, because I think it's impossible for a place as Europe with a place in which in the past we won - we won only when we decide to open the borders, not close.

Europe - and President Clinton, obviously he's here the number one to verify this point - Europe has the identity when the Berlin Walls fell out. Now, the risk of Europe is not the problem of Russia for me; is not the problem of austerity for me - is that Hungary build a new wall, because for my mother, the moment of identity of Europe was when Berlin Walls fell out. For my children, I really worried if I think between Hungarian and Croatia, we can build a new wall.

ZAKARIA: President Clinton, can you tell us what you think about the main crisis that has been in the news recently, which is the migration crisis. And it’s accelerated but, as you well know, you mentioned to me earlier, this year we have seen the largest number of displaced people since World War II, 60 million people. It seems to me we've gotten to a point where, because technology and media and a certain degree of means allows - allow people to see a better life and to find a way to leave their countries, they can't get - they are not taken in anywhere and so you have 60 million people around the world trapped in this no man's land.

How do we solve this? What happens?

PRESIDENT BILL CLINTON: Well, first, I'll do my best to answer that, but if you think about what George said and what the Prime Minister said, it wasn't until very long ago that Europeans were killing each other in large numbers. The European Union itself is a miracle.

The eurozone assumed great economic significance as long as the economy was growing. As soon as it turned down, the problems of the eurozone became apparent.

The world is no less interdependent than it was five years ago, 10 years ago. It's more interdependent. But in times of insecurity, fueled by both political problems and the absence of economic growth, negative identity politics tend to trump positive identity politics.

The European idea requires a level of security, personal and collective security, to embrace. It doesn't mean it's not worth fighting for or that the battle’s over. You know, we didn't repeal the laws of human nature. We didn't all of a sudden elevate human consciousness overnight. This is a long battle. But I'm with you, it's worth fighting - it's worth fighting for. So...

ZAKARIA: Can I ask you one corollary?


ZAKARIA: Do you think that that issue of negative versus positive identity, when you have slow growth, is true in America, as well?

CLINTON: Absolutely. Absolutely. You get these - that's the Republican presidential debates. You have people who live in coal country who lost 20,000 jobs before Barack Obama took the oath of office responding to Mr. Trump saying that if I just throw the immigrants out who are undocumented and stop the Chinese products from coming in, you will be hunky-dory.

But the truth is, they're physically isolated in an industry where employment peaked in 1920 - 95 years ago. And nobody has done anything for them. It is a microcosm of what you see in Greece, what you see in parts of Italy, what you see in parts of Spain - the whole deal.

And we need to all just take a step back and say if this is worth fighting for, let's just take this thing piece by piece.

But I don't think you should give up on the European dream, nor do I think you can get it back as it was in the heyday of the '90s overnight. You have to build it back, and you have to realize oh, this is really terrible - compared to what? What Europe was in the 1940s? I don't think so. What it was in the 1870s? No. See, we just have to keep going.

We can't get away from each other, so the world is going to be defined by positive identity politics or negative identity politics. In insecure times, the negative always has the advantage.  You have to fight it. And you don't win in a day. You win a long, long battle.

### END ###

Topics: CNN • CNN International • Fareed Zakaria • Fareed Zakaria GPS • Italy • Syria
September 27th, 2015
10:01 AM ET

Fmr Pres Clinton on the P5+1 deal: "I think - this is going to be a good thing. But it's very important to be tough in enforcing it."

Please credit any usage to “CNN’s FAREED ZAKARIA GPS”

The following transcript is of an interview by Fareed Zakaria with former President Bill Clinton.  They discussed the current presidential campaign, Hillary Clinton’s run for president, Donald Trump and the GOP brand, the civil war in Syria, good news on the United Nations’ development goals and Clinton Global Initiative accomplishments, the P5+1 nuclear deal with Iran, and Russia’s interventions in Ukraine.

MANDATORY CREDIT for reference and usage: “CNN’s Fareed Zakaria GPS”


Topics: CNN • Fareed Zakaria • Fareed Zakaria GPS
September 20th, 2015
03:19 PM ET

Financial Times' Gillian Tett to Fareed Zakaria: "Facebook...[has] tried to be the anti-Sony..."

Please credit any usage to “CNN’s FAREED ZAKARIA GPS”

The following transcript is of an interview by Fareed Zakaria with Dr. Gillian Tett, The Financial Times’ U.S. managing editor and author of The Silo Effect: The Peril of Expertise and the Promise of Breaking Down Barriers (2015). She explained how organizations can institutionalize “thinking outside of the box”. She also described how hyper specialization and miscommunication creates issues in companies.

MANDATORY CREDIT for reference and usage: “CNN’s FAREED ZAKARIA GPS”


Topics: CNN • Fareed Zakaria • Fareed Zakaria GPS
September 20th, 2015
03:19 PM ET

Karim Sadjapour on Iran's internal war over P5+1 deal: "...both the supporters & opponents of the deal believe the Supreme Leader agrees with their position”

Please credit any usage to “CNN’s FAREED ZAKARIA GPS”

The following transcript is of an interview by Fareed Zakaria with Thomas Erdbrink, The New York Times’ Tehran Bureau chief and Karim Sadjadpour, senior associate for Carnegie Endowment for International Peace.  Erdbrink discussed Iran’s debate over cooperating with the United States on the P5+1 deal, while Sadjadpour explained Khamenei’s position on the deal.


Topics: CNN • Fareed Zakaria • Fareed Zakaria GPS
September 13th, 2015
11:03 AM ET

Telecom billionaire Naguib Sawiris on Syrian refugee crisis: "I cannot just sit–and just do nothing and pretend it's not my problem."

Please credit any usage to “CNN’s FAREED ZAKARIA GPS”

The following transcript is of an interview by Fareed Zakaria with Orascom Telecom Media and Technology CEO, Naguib Sawiris. They discussed the billionaire philanthropist’s idea to solve the Syrian refugee crisis and the inspiration for his proposed solution.

MANDATORY CREDIT for reference and usage: “CNN’s Fareed Zakaria GPS”


Topics: CNN • Fareed Zakaria • Fareed Zakaria GPS
September 13th, 2015
11:03 AM ET

Fmr MI6 Chief Sawers on Syrian refugees: "...[these] are people seeking a better life for themselves. I don't think we should treat the refugees as potential terrorists"

Please credit any usage to “CNN’s FAREED ZAKARIA GPS”

The following transcript is of an interview by Fareed Zakaria with former Chief of the British Secret Intelligence Service (MI6), Sir Robert John Sawers GCMG. They discussed the P5+1 deal with Iran, today’s top security threats, Sawers' thoughts on President Obama's foreign policy, the Syrian refugee crisis in Europe and whether Sawers believes the massive migration of refugees into Europe from Syria poses a potential terrorism threat. Sawers also discussed his views on global security challenges involving Iran, Russia, and China and why the lack of an international framework for threat responses increases the vulnerabilities.

MANDATORY CREDIT for reference and usage: “CNN’s Fareed Zakaria GPS”


Topics: CNN • Fareed Zakaria • Fareed Zakaria GPS
September 5th, 2015
02:17 PM ET

GPS Moonshots: Sending astronauts to Mars

Fareed interviews NASA Administrator Charles Bolden on NASA's plans to send a manned mission to Mars in the 2030s. Why do it?

Topics: CNN • Fareed Zakaria • Fareed Zakaria GPS
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