Putin to Fareed Zakaria: 'The U.S. is a great power. At the moment, it is probably the only superpower and we accept this fact'
June 19th, 2016
11:23 AM ET

Putin to Fareed Zakaria: 'The U.S. is a great power. At the moment, it is probably the only superpower and we accept this fact'

At 1:00pmET on CNN/U.S., a special edition of CNN’s FAREED ZAKARIA GPS features a wide-ranging discussion with Russia’s President Vladimir Putin on the subjects of U.S.-Russian relations, the European Union, the 2016 U.S. election, the extended conflicts in Ukraine and Syria, and doping allegations against Russian athletes hoping to go to the 2016 Olympic Games.

Italy's Prime Minister Matteo Renzi discusses the potential 'permanent' impact on Europe for a potential 'Brexit' vote; and Kazakhstan’s President Nursultan Nazarbayev discusses the possibility of a female president in his country in the future.

This wide-ranging discussion encores today on both CNN/U.S. and CNN International.   Please check here for additional airtimes across CNN's broadcast networks: http://edition.cnn.com/tv/schedule/europe

###

October 18th, 2015
04:22 PM ET

#FZGPS: President Poroshenko on MH17 and whether Ukraine is ready to join NATO

On Sunday’s FAREED ZAKARIA GPS on CNN/U.S. features an exclusive interview with Ukrainian President Petro Poroshenko who spoke about the Dutch investigation this week that concluded last year’s Malaysian Airlines Flight 17 was shot from the sky by a Russian-made missile and whether Ukraine is ready to join NATO.

MANDATORY CREDIT for reference and usage: “CNN’s FAREED ZAKARIA GPS”

FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPT

THIS IS A RUSH TRANSCRIPT. THIS COPY MAY NOT BE IN ITS FINAL FORM AND MAY BE UPDATED.

FAREED ZAKARIA, HOST:  When Malaysian Airlines Flight 17 was shot down over Ukraine 15 months ago, 193 Dutch citizens perished. This week, their nation, the Netherlands, released a damning investigative report on how and why its citizens and 105 others died. The report pointed fingers in two different directions. It said that a Russian-made Bukh missile fired from territory controlled by pro-Russian separatists is what downed the airliner. But the report also put some lesser blame on Ukraine, saying the nation had sufficient reason to close its air space before the shoot down occurred. Joining me now for an exclusive interview is Ukraine's president, Petro Poroshenko. Thank you for joining me, Mr. President.

PETRO POROSHENKO, PRESIDENT OF UKRAINE: Thank you for the invitation.

ZAKARIA: Do you believe that Ukraine should have shut down its air space, given the knowledge you had, the violence that was already afoot?

POROSHENKO: Yeah, of course, Ukraine is strictly follow all the recommendations of the ICAO and at that time we closed the air space at the height, it seems to me, 9,725 meters. We don't have any information which give us the necessity to close the air spot above this echelon and we strictly followed the recommendation of the ICAO.

We cannot imagine that the Russia will transfer these highly sophisticated and very technological weapons to the hands of the terrorists and they don't have any background, any–basis for making this decision.

ZAKARIA: One of the things people are trying to figure out in the West is, is Vladimir Putin searching for a negotiated settlement in Ukraine? Is he searching for a way to deescalate the situation, to stabilize the situation because he faces a shrinking economy, sanctions, a collapse of oil prices, and now, of course, he has this intervention in Syria? Do you believe that Putin is looking for some kind of settlement?

Do you see any signs of that?

POROSHENKO: I wish, but unfortunately, no. Unfortunately, the - until the September, we have an active committed operation and only now, we have a cease-fire. But unfortunately we don't have any continuation of the implementation of the Minsk process. The same as I told you, the first decision which Putin should make is withdraw his troops from Ukrainian territory. And I think that the absolutely irresponsible behavior of Russia in Syria, when he launched this operation, this is simply continued the logic, logic which we said even last year, at first, it was the Crimea, second, it was Donbass, third, it is Syria, fourth maybe, I don't know, Afghanistan.

And nobody knows where the Russian green soldiers can appear in the very next moment.

ZAKARIA: Mr. President, you were seen recently in a Ukrainian plane that has been outfitted to NATO standards. And so I wonder do you want Ukraine to become a member of NATO?

POROSHENKO: This is a very important question. Of course, I want peace, security as a president for my country and for my people, especially in this situation, where we are under attack of Russia, when we are the object of aggression. And NATO today is maybe the only most effective mechanism to provide security, because after Russian aggression in my country, they completely destroyed all the post-war security systems based on the statute and charter and principles of the United Nations, because when we have a situation, one of the permanent members of the Security Council is an aggressor, that - and he's using his veto right, that means that the old mechanism which was created is not working.

And now it is my responsibility to provide and implement reform in my country, to transform the country to the NATO. And then we will have this discussion. I think I need for that at least five, six years.

ZAKARIA: Mr. President, a pleasure to have you on.

POROSHENKO: Thank you very much indeed.

END

October 4th, 2015
03:09 PM ET

Fareed Zakaria GPS: Benjamin Netanyahu on Russia, Iran, U.S.

On today's FAREED ZAKARIA GPS Israel's Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, who was in New York for the opening of United Nations General Assembly debate, discussed Israel’s relationships with the United States and Russia, Ukraine, the civil war inside Syria, and Israel’s opposition to the P5 + 1 nuclear deal with Iran – including his reaction to former President Clinton’s assessment of his Congressional speech as ‘unprecedented.’

MANDATORY CREDIT for reference and usage: “CNN’s FAREED ZAKARIA GPS”

VIDEO HIGHLIGHTS

Israel’s Prime Minister Netanyahu on Russia's actions inside Syria

Netanyahu on Palestinian Prime Minister Abbas’ statements rejecting the Oslo Accords – and his son’s calls for citizenship rights

Netanyahu’s reaction to former President Clinton’s assessment of his ‘unprecedented’ Congressional speech

FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPT

THIS IS A RUSH TRANSCRIPT. THIS COPY MAY NOT BE IN ITS FINAL FORM AND MAY BE UPDATED.

Fareed Zakaria, host, Fareed Zakaria GPS:  Israel’s Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu was in New York this week to deliver a fiery speech on Thursday to the UN General Assembly.

On Friday, I sat down with him to talk about many topics, all hot buttons at the UN this week: Syria, ISIS, the Iran nuclear deal, and the future of Middle East peace.

Prime Minister, pleasure to have you on.

BENJAMIN NETANYAHU, PRIME MINISTER of ISRAEL:  Good to be back with you, Fareed.

ZAKARIA:   You have painted often a situation that Israel faces that is pretty tough, but I'm now looking at what's going on in Syria and I see Iran all in to try to defend the Assad regime; I see Hezbollah strained, stressed - there are reports that they've lost hundreds, maybe thousands of fighters. Iranian militias are mired there, fighting against ISIS.

Aren't your enemies drained and bleeding right now? Doesn't that give you some space in security terms?

NETANYAHU: Well, that's not exactly what we see. What I see is Iran pushing into Lebanon, into Hezbollah as they’re fighting for Assad; they’re putting inside Lebanon the most devastating weapons on Earth. They’re trying to turn Iran’s rockets that they supplied Hezbollah into precision-guided missiles that can hit any spot in Israel. Hezbollah is putting in SA-22 anti-aircraft missiles that can shoot down our planes, Yakhont anti-ship missiles that can shoot down our gas rigs. That's what we're seeing. And we see Iran trying to establish a second front with Iranian generals in the Golan Heights against Israel.

So we see a different picture. And I've made it very clear what our policy in Syria is. I haven’t intervened in the Syrian internal conflict. But I've said that if anybody wants to use Syrian territory to attack us, we'll take action. If anybody is trying to build a second front against Israel from the Golan, we'll take action. And if anybody wants to use Syrian territory to transfer nuclear weapons to Hezbollah, we'll take action. And we continue to do that.

ZAKARIA: Donald Trump says between Assad and ISIS, he thinks Assad is better. Is Assad better for Israel?

NETANYAHU: Look, I don't know who's better. You know what you have there in Syria, you've got - you've got Assad, you've got Iran, you've got Hezbollah, you've got Daesh, ISIS. You've got these rebels and those rebels. And now you've got Russia. Do you know what's better? I don't know. I know what I have to do to protect the security of Israel.

And the thing that I do is I draw red lines and any time we have the intel, we just keep them. We do not let those actions of aggression against Israel go unpunished.

ZAKARIA: Do you think that Russia's involvement is potentially stabilizing or destabilizing?

NETANYAHU: I don't know. I think time will tell. But I did go to Moscow and spoke very candidly to President Putin and just told him exactly what I just told you. I said these are our policies. We don't want to go back to the days when, you know, Russia and Israel were in an adversarial position. I think we've changed the relationship. And it's, on the whole, good. It's not like the one we have with the United States. Nothing will ever equal that.

But we certainly don't want an adversarial relationship. So we agreed that in a few days’ time, our deputy chiefs of staff will meet to arrange deconfliction - to make sure that we don't bump into Iran. We have different goals. In Syria, I've defined my goals. They're to protect the security of my people and my country. Russia has different goals. But they shouldn't clash.

ZAKARIA: You are a man who has often spoken out against aggression, against, you know - particularly against small countries. One place you have been studiously quiet is Russia's - what many people call aggression against Crimea. And when you were asked about it, you said, well, I've got a lot on my plate. But you are an international statesman. What is your view of what Russia, what Vladimir Putin did in annexing Crimea?

NETANYAHU: We went along with the provisions that the American government put forward. I mean it's very clear we don't approve of this Russian action. But I think we're also cognizant of the fact that we have a - we're bordering Russia right now.

And we are - Israel is a strong country. It's a small strong country. But we also know that we have to make sure that we don't get into unnecessary conflicts. And we have - believe me, we have a lot on our plate. I went to Moscow to make it clear that we should avoid a clash between Russian forces and Israeli forces. That's about as responsible, I think, and statesmanly as I think we should act at this point.

ZAKARIA: What's your view of Putin?

NETANYAHU: Look, there's mutual respect, but that doesn't mean that we have mutual coherence of interests. It's not - it's not the relationship that we have with the United States of America. It never can be. But I think it's important that we make every effort right now to avoid a concussion.

///

ZAKARIA: When we come back, I will ask Prime Minister Netanyahu, the Iran nuclear deal’s biggest opponent, what if any options he has left.

[COMMERCIAL BREAK]

ZAKARIA: Back now to more of my interview with Israel’s Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, who was in New York this week for the UN General Assembly. ///

ZAKARIA: Prime Minister, let me show you a chart. You presented a graphic when you came to the UN, and you detailed exactly what was dangerous about Iran's quest to enrich uranium. And you said this was the key - how much enriched uranium they had. And you drew a line. So I'm going to show you this - this was the - the line you put. This is a chart put out by the White House. And they say, you are right, that Iran was at this point, the red line that you described. But, they say, with this deal, before the sanctions are lifted, Iran has to destroy 98 percent of its enriched uranium; of course, the plutonium pathway, which is the most common way, is blocked, and that the line would have to be drawn way down here.

So I'm asking you, are they right?

NETANYAHU: Look, I'm not going to rehash the deal. I summarized yesterday our main opposition. I didn’t go into the question of centrifuges or R&D or inspections…
ZAKARIA: But are they right? This seems to me - I mean, I asked experts, and they said, yes, if Iran does in the first year before the sanctions are lifted, what it is required to do, it goes - it goes way down.

NETANYAHU: Well, there are a lot of questions that will remain open on this question. But there's one that isn't, and that is that after year 10 and after year 15, all these limitations are lifted. And therefore, Iran will be free to get to the point where it's at the threshold level of producing the fissile material, the nuclear - the indispensable nuclear material, through enrichment, to make an arsenal of nuclear bombs.

ZAKARIA: But they're there right now, as per Bibi Netanyahu's speech two years ago.

NETANYAHU: But they were - but they were held back because of biting sanctions that are now going to be removed.

So I don't want to rehash this. And I was very clear about that. I didn't go into the details. I said, OK, now that it's done, let's look forward. Let's keep Iran's feet to the fire. Let's make sure that they keep all their obligations under the nuclear deal. That's the first thing.

Second thing - let's block Iran's other aggression in the region, because they're doing everything. They're trying to encircle Israel with a noose of death. They're sending weapons to the Houthis. They're in Iraq. They're in Afghanistan. They're all over the place. In Yemen, of course. Let's bolster those forces to stand up to Iran's aggression in the region, and none is stronger, none is more reliable than Israel. So I look forward to discussing President Obama's offer to bolster Israel's security when I visit the United States in November.

And the third thing I said - and I drew attention to something that is not well known - let's tear down Iran's global terror network. They're in over 30 countries. They're establishing terror cells in the Western Hemisphere alongside the Eastern Hemisphere. These are things that we agree on.

Yes, we had a disagreement in the family, as President Obama and I both said. But we have no disagreement about blocking Iran's aggression and working against its terrorism. And I think that's what we should focus on now.

ZAKARIA: Last week, Bill Clinton, on this program, said that he thought your speech to the United States Congress at the invitation of John Boehner was unprecedented. And I asked him then, was it unwise? He said, you'll have to ask Prime Minister Netanyahu that.

Was it unwise?

NETANYAHU: I'll ask you a question. If the President of the United States thought that a deal was being forged that would endanger the security and even the very survival of the United States, wouldn't you expect him to speak up at every place, at every forum?

And the answer is, of course you would. That was my obligation. Again, I don't think that we should rehash this. But I think we should focus on what we do agree must be done right now.

President Obama was - called me up at the time that the deal was being debated. And he said, I'd like to talk to you about bolstering Israel's security, about maintaining its qualitative military edge, about preventing things from going into Iran's proxies. Would you like to do that now, or would you like to do it later? And I said I'd like to do it later, the day after.

Well, today in my conversation with John Kerry, this is the day after. And we began that conversation. Our secretary - our minister of defense will be coming to Washington to meet Secretary Carter in a few weeks. And after that, I'll meet President Obama.

I look forward to discussing this with the President. I think it's a very important stage to help us face the challenges that we face.

ZAKARIA: If two years from now, Iran has, in fact, destroyed 98 percent of its en - highly enriched uranium, if the Fordow and Arak facilities have been rendered inoperable, will you call President Obama and say, you know what, maybe this worked a little better than I thought it did?

NETANYAHU: I'll be the happiest person in the world if my concerns prove to be wrong. I - you know, the opposite could also happen, you know.

But I think the issue right now is - it's a practical question right now. It's not an ideological question. It's not a political question. It's a practical question - do they keep the agreement?

And second, what happens 15 years from now, or 10 years from now, when they're basically absolved of any restrictions, which is the main point I've been making. Because, see, they get all these restrictions lifted regardless of their policy. If they continue their aggression...

ZAKARIA: But you get 15 years with no nuclear - with a non-nuclear Iran.

NETANYAHU: Well, assuming they don't cheat.

ZAKARIA: Right.

NETANYAHU: And second, you're also assuming that they would have gone on and continued in the face of very strong sanctions and a military threat. We can - we can argue that. But that's not my purpose now.

My purpose is to focus on what we do agree on. And we absolutely agree on the need to block Iran's aggression in the region. That was never part of the deal - that you let them have a free reign. And the second thing is how to bolster Israel's security, and, by the way, other allies that are facing this same Iranian threat.

And I'd also draw attention to their global terror network. That - these are things that we can concentrate on, and we agree on, and we should cooperate on, and we will cooperate on.  ///

ZAKARIA: When we come back, did any lingering hopes for Middle East peace just blow up at the UN this week? I’ll ask the Prime Minister when we come back.

[COMMERCIAL BREAK]

ZAKARIA: Prime Minister, you know that the Palestinian leader Mahmoud Abbas has said that he is essentially not going to follow the Oslo process - they will not abide by it any more. You mentioned it in your speech. I want to ask you, since it does feel like the peace process is dead, you know, if it ever had much life in it, about his son. There have been reports…

NETANYAHU: His son?

ZAKARIA: His son has - there are a couple of reports which talked about - a New York Times report, where he gave an interview, and he said, I'm not for my father's plan. I think the peace process is dead. I don't want a two-state solution. I want a one-state solution. I just want rights. I just want political rights. If you're not going to give me a state, give me political rights.

You know that there are other Palestinians who feel this way. In fact, there's Khalil Shikaki, a pollster, who say about a third of Palestinians now, and it is more for younger Palestinians, want just political rights. Will they get them?

NETANYAHU: Well, I think that the right solution is a demilitarized Palestinian state that recognizes the Jewish state. They want a Palestinian state; we have a Jewish state. We should have mutual recognition of these two nation states and provisions on the ground by which Israel can defend itself by itself. And I think that's eminently preferable to the idea of a unitary state, which I don't want.

I think the reason the peace process doesn't get - doesn't move forward is because the Palestinians have basically two provisions there. I mean, one is you've got to renounce terrorism and act against it. And unfortunately, that's not what they're doing. We just had, you know, a young mother and a young father brutally murdered by Palestinian terrorists - four little orphans in the back of the car. And President Abbas has yet to denounce this.

I mean, on the rare occasions that we have - and we do have, on certain occasions, acts of terrorism by Jews, we always go there like gangbusters. We condemn it. We do everything we can to find them and to fight them.

I expect President Abbas to do the same. So one is, you have to stop this incitement against Israel, because incitement leads to acts of terrorism. But the second thing is you've got to stay in the process. You've got to come and sit on the table.

ZAKARIA: Why not use this opportunity to make a bold counter offer, not just a process one, but an actual proposal for a Palestinian state?

NETANYAHU: Well, I've made several offers, but, you know, the only way - his offers and my offers obviously don't cohere - and I said, look, the only way you're going to do this is let's sit around the table. Here's the litmus test for you…

ZAKARIA: But he says the problem is you're building settlements, even in…

NETANYAHU: Well, I, you know…

ZAKARIA: - even in Area C…

NETANYAHU: - I think the problem is he's inciting terrorism. I think the problem is he's spreading lies about the Temple Mount and what we're doing there. We're the guardians of the Temple Mount - for God's sake, without Israel, you know, what’ll happen on those sacred sites would be what happened in Palmyra in Syria.

ZAKARIA: You…

NETANYAHU: But he - so I have complaints; he has complaints. There's only one way to get a peace process going, peace negotiations going - you've got to sit down and negotiate.

Yet in the seven years that I've been now in - sitting in the prime minister's office in Israel, we haven't had seven hours that he was willing to talk. And it's not because of me. The fact is, I'm willing to have this conversation. He's not.

ZAKARIA: Well he says you're creating facts on the ground...

NETANYAHU: Well so is he…

ZAKARIA: - by building settlements.

NETANYAHU: So is he. He's creating a lot of facts on the ground, and bad facts.

ZAKARIA: - OK, a last question.

You talked about terrorism against Palestinians, terrorism by Israelis. President - the president of Israel says - wonders - he posed this question, why is this culture of extremism flourishing in Israel right now? Do you think that there is an atmosphere that has - that has incited or allowed this kind of extremism to flourish?

NETANYAHU: No, I think the test is not whether societies have extremists; the question is what do the - what does the mainstream do about it. In our case, we go wild against them. Every part of our society unites against any example of terrorism in our midst.

But what I say in Ramallah is that President Abbas calls public squares in honor of mass murderers. And that's unfortunate - that's not - it's a tragedy, I think - for us and the Palestinians, too. The culture of peace, the culture of acceptance, a culture of diversity, you know, for women, for Christians, for gays and so on, is very much ingrained in our culture. And that's why we don't educate our people that we have to destroy the Palestinian. We want peace with the Palestinians. But for that, we have to sit down. And I think that's one order of the day.

And the other order of the day is what I said before. I think we have to protect ourselves against the rising tide of militant Islam - religious fanaticism that is threatening all of us. And Israel is there. It's standing in the breach. And I appreciate the fact that despite our disagreement on the Iran nuclear deal, both the supporters of the deal and the opponents of the deal, those who supported it, those who oppose it, they all agree now we have to strengthen Israel.

And I think that's the best guarantor of peace.

ZAKARIA: Prime Minister Netanyahu, thank you so much.

NETANYAHU: Thank you.  Thank you, Fareed.

### END ###


Topics: CNN • CNN International • Fareed Zakaria • Fareed Zakaria GPS • Iran • Israel • Russia • Syria • Ukraine
February 15th, 2015
01:54 PM ET

Panetta: Netanyahu will "make this a partisan divide between Democrats and Republicans."

Today on CNN’s State of the Union, former Secretary of Defense and former director of the CIA, Leon Panetta, joined CNN’s Chief White House Correspondent, Jim Acosta, to discuss the instability in the Middle East, Putin’s aggressive foreign policy, Prime Minister Netanyahu’s speech to Congress, and President Obama’s performance regarding said issues.

FULL POST


Topics: Iraq • ISIS • Israel • Jim Acosta • Russia • State of the Union • Syria • Ukraine
Cruz: No U.S. boots on the ground against ISIS
February 8th, 2015
04:18 PM ET

Cruz: No U.S. boots on the ground against ISIS

Today on CNN’s State of the Union, Senator Ted Cruz (R-TX) spoke to Dana Bash from the Munich Security Conference about the war on ISIS, violence in Ukraine, and his plans for 2016.

VIDEOS

Cruz: No U.S. boots on the ground against ISIS

Is Ted Cruz the Republican Barack Obama?

Cruz: U.S. should provide defensive weapons to Ukraine

Sen. Ted Cruz extended interview – Part 1

Sen. Ted Cruz extended interview – Part 2

TEXT HIGHLIGHTS

Cruz on fighting ISIS: “We met today with the president of Kurdistan. And the Kurds on the ground are fantastic fighters. The Peshmerga have been our allies. They have been our friends. And they're actually fighting every day to stop ISIS. Now, Dana, what makes no sense whatsoever is, the Obama administration is refusing to directly arm the Kurds. We need to arm the Kurds now because they are our boots on the ground. I don't believe it is necessary to put American boots on the ground if we are arming the Peshmerga. They're fighting there. Just today, they didn't ask us for boots on the ground, but what they did say is they need the weaponry to stand up and destroy ISIS. And the Peshmerga on the ground, combined with overwhelming American airpower, can take out ISIS. But we're not seeing leadership from the administration to get that done. Instead, they continue to send weaponry to Baghdad, who doesn't pass it onto the Peshmerga, and it doesn't get put to use effectively.”

Cruz on Department of Homeland Security funding: “the Democrats are working as a unit to filibuster funding for the Department of Homeland Security. And it's one of the patterns we've seen the last six years that's really unusual, is that Senate Democrats have consistently been unwilling to take on the president. It's part of why Harry Reid and the Democrats shut down the Senate. And I got to say it's unprecedented. I mean, look, Dana, if there's one thing that I think you would acknowledge I've been willing to do is take on my own party when my own party is not standing for the principles we're supposed to stand for. It is time to see some Senate Democrats willing to take on their own president but right now they're putting partisan politics ahead of principle and that's why they're filibustering the funding for Homeland Security. It's the wrong thing to be doing.”

Cruz on violence in the Ukraine: “what we're seeing is, when America doesn't lead, Europe can't be expected to step into the breach. What is missing from this is the president of the United States. And I have got to tell you, Dana, I'm part of a large bipartisan congressional delegation here. And it is striking that, across bipartisan lines, the delegation is united on the need for us to get serious and provide defensive arms to Ukraine.”

Full transcript: FULL POST


Topics: Dana Bash • Iran • Iraq • ISIS • Russia • State of the Union • Ukraine
CNN's Nick Paton Walsh gets firsthand look at devastated Donetsk airport
February 2nd, 2015
02:55 PM ET

CNN's Nick Paton Walsh gets firsthand look at devastated Donetsk airport

Amid active shelling by the Ukrainian military, CNN's senior international correspondent Nick Paton Walsh (@npwcnn) gets a firsthand look at the devastated Donetsk International Airport.

Walsh recalls flying out of this airport just six months ago, and now very little of it remains.

"Hard to imagine how just six months ago we were here flying out of Donetsk at this – what was then a state-of-the-art terminal. Just look at the destruction and how this symbolizes how far eastern Ukraine has fallen."

FULL POST


Topics: Breaking News • Nick Paton Walsh • Ukraine
Ukrainian president tells CNN Ukraine may seek more sanctions against Russia
January 22nd, 2015
10:18 AM ET

Ukrainian president tells CNN Ukraine may seek more sanctions against Russia

Ukraine is ready to push for more sanctions against Russia, President Petro Poroshenko told CNN’s Richard Quest.

Speaking on the sidelines of the World Economic Forum in Davos before a meeting between Russia and Ukraine on Wednesday, Poroshenko said there was no room for negotiation.

"Everything was agreed and signed in Minsk," he said, referring to a pact signed in September with the aim of halting the conflict between Ukrainian government forces and separatist pro-Russian rebels.

Ukraine expects Russia to present a plan for implementing the agreement, which calls for an immediate ceasefire, freeing of any hostages, and the withdrawal of armed groups and military equipment from Ukrainian territory.

"The purpose of sanctions is not to hurt Russia. The purpose of sanctions is just to keep Russia to be responsible."

FULL POST

January 18th, 2015
03:03 PM ET

Sen. Murphy: Send military assistance to Ukraine

Sen. Chris Murphy (D-CT) tells Jim Sciutto "the United States needs to start sending more significant military assistance to the Ukraine." Full transcript of the discussion is available after the jump.

FULL POST

CNN takes three AIB awards, Richard Quest named TV Personality of the Year
(Left to right) Richard Quest, London Bureau Chief Tommy Evans & Moscow Correspondent Phil Black
November 5th, 2014
06:28 PM ET

CNN takes three AIB awards, Richard Quest named TV Personality of the Year

CNN celebrated three wins at the 2014 Association for International Broadcasting awards, hosted at the LSO St Luke’s in London on Wednesday night.

For the second year running, CNN was awarded the prize for best ‘Live Television Journalism’, this time for its reporting on the downing of Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 over Ukraine.

CNN also won in the 'Short News Report’ category for its coverage of a shooting which took place during clashes between Ukrainian security forces and protestors in Kiev’s Independence Square.

The climax of the evening, however, was the naming of Richard Quest as the 'Television Personality of the Year.' Quest, whose dynamic and distinctive style has made him a unique figure in the field of business broadcasting, was at the ceremony to personally receive the award. FULL POST

July 21st, 2014
11:39 AM ET

CNN Coverage: the downing of Malaysia Flight #17 in Ukraine and Gaza-Israel Crisis

Monday, July 21:

CNN's Chris Cuomo sits down with the rebel leader of the self-styled Donetsk People's Republic Alexander Borodai to discuss the downing of MH17.

Sunday, July 20:

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu to CNN's Wolf Blitzer:  “I support taking whatever action is necessary to stop this insane situation…"

On CNN's State of the Union: Secretary of State John Kerry to CNN's Candy Crowley: "There is no trust with the Russians" 

CNN correspondents on the ground covering Malaysia Airlines MH17 crash in Ukraine and Gaza-Israel crisis from the following locations:

Ukraine:

Phil Black – @PhilBlackCNN

Ivan Watson – @IvanCNN

Chris Cuomo – @ChrisCuomo

Nick Paton Walsh – @npwcnn

Kyung Lah – @kyunglahCNN

 

Moscow, Russia:

Diana Magnay – @dimagnayCNN

 

Amsterdam, Netherlands:

Erin McLaughlin – @ErinCNN

Saima Mohsin – @SaimaMohsin

 

Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia:

Andrew Stevens – @AndrewCNN

 

Jerusalem:

Wolf Blitzer – @wolfblitzer

Martin Savidge – @martinsavidge

John Vause – @vauseCNN

 

Israel at Gaza border:

Atika Shubert – @atikaCNN

 

Gaza:

Ben Wedeman – @benCNN

Karl Penhaul – @karlpenhaul

 

Pentagon: 

Barbara Starr – @barbarastarcnn

 

State Department:

Elise Labott – @eliselabottcnn

 

United Nations:

Richard Roth – @RichardRothCNN

 

tmpl
« older posts