Blindsided: How ISIS Shook the World to air TONIGHT, Nov. 17 on CNN/U.S. and CNN International #FZGPS
November 17th, 2015
02:43 PM ET

Blindsided: How ISIS Shook the World to air TONIGHT, Nov. 17 on CNN/U.S. and CNN International #FZGPS

The origins of the terror group known as Islamic State or ‘ISIS,’ and what they want, are explored by CNN’s Fareed Zakaria, in a one-hour special, Blindsided: How ISIS Shook the World, tonight, Tuesday, Nov. 17 at 9:00pm Eastern on CNN/U.S. and CNN International.   

Deputy National Security Advisor for strategic communication Ben Rhodes; a former jihadi who now leads a counter-extremism think tank, Quilliam, Maajid Nawaz; former director of the U.S. Defense Intelligence Agency, Lt. General Michael Flynn; Middle East expert and London School of Economics professor of international relations Fawaz Gerges; former FBI agent Ali Soufan; and others discuss the ambitions and goals of the terror group.

The chief objective of ISIS, or Daesh, is its unique vision of a caliphate – and luring American and Western troops back to the Middle East to apocalyptic ground in combat.

Also discussed, how ISIS grew to become a transnational terror organization, how it recruits followers, what is being done to try to stop it – and what does and doesn’t seem to be working.

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October 4th, 2015
03:09 PM ET

Fareed Zakaria GPS: Benjamin Netanyahu on Russia, Iran, U.S.

On today's FAREED ZAKARIA GPS Israel's Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, who was in New York for the opening of United Nations General Assembly debate, discussed Israel’s relationships with the United States and Russia, Ukraine, the civil war inside Syria, and Israel’s opposition to the P5 + 1 nuclear deal with Iran – including his reaction to former President Clinton’s assessment of his Congressional speech as ‘unprecedented.’

MANDATORY CREDIT for reference and usage: “CNN’s FAREED ZAKARIA GPS”

VIDEO HIGHLIGHTS

Israel’s Prime Minister Netanyahu on Russia's actions inside Syria

Netanyahu on Palestinian Prime Minister Abbas’ statements rejecting the Oslo Accords – and his son’s calls for citizenship rights

Netanyahu’s reaction to former President Clinton’s assessment of his ‘unprecedented’ Congressional speech

FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPT

THIS IS A RUSH TRANSCRIPT. THIS COPY MAY NOT BE IN ITS FINAL FORM AND MAY BE UPDATED.

Fareed Zakaria, host, Fareed Zakaria GPS:  Israel’s Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu was in New York this week to deliver a fiery speech on Thursday to the UN General Assembly.

On Friday, I sat down with him to talk about many topics, all hot buttons at the UN this week: Syria, ISIS, the Iran nuclear deal, and the future of Middle East peace.

Prime Minister, pleasure to have you on.

BENJAMIN NETANYAHU, PRIME MINISTER of ISRAEL:  Good to be back with you, Fareed.

ZAKARIA:   You have painted often a situation that Israel faces that is pretty tough, but I'm now looking at what's going on in Syria and I see Iran all in to try to defend the Assad regime; I see Hezbollah strained, stressed - there are reports that they've lost hundreds, maybe thousands of fighters. Iranian militias are mired there, fighting against ISIS.

Aren't your enemies drained and bleeding right now? Doesn't that give you some space in security terms?

NETANYAHU: Well, that's not exactly what we see. What I see is Iran pushing into Lebanon, into Hezbollah as they’re fighting for Assad; they’re putting inside Lebanon the most devastating weapons on Earth. They’re trying to turn Iran’s rockets that they supplied Hezbollah into precision-guided missiles that can hit any spot in Israel. Hezbollah is putting in SA-22 anti-aircraft missiles that can shoot down our planes, Yakhont anti-ship missiles that can shoot down our gas rigs. That's what we're seeing. And we see Iran trying to establish a second front with Iranian generals in the Golan Heights against Israel.

So we see a different picture. And I've made it very clear what our policy in Syria is. I haven’t intervened in the Syrian internal conflict. But I've said that if anybody wants to use Syrian territory to attack us, we'll take action. If anybody is trying to build a second front against Israel from the Golan, we'll take action. And if anybody wants to use Syrian territory to transfer nuclear weapons to Hezbollah, we'll take action. And we continue to do that.

ZAKARIA: Donald Trump says between Assad and ISIS, he thinks Assad is better. Is Assad better for Israel?

NETANYAHU: Look, I don't know who's better. You know what you have there in Syria, you've got - you've got Assad, you've got Iran, you've got Hezbollah, you've got Daesh, ISIS. You've got these rebels and those rebels. And now you've got Russia. Do you know what's better? I don't know. I know what I have to do to protect the security of Israel.

And the thing that I do is I draw red lines and any time we have the intel, we just keep them. We do not let those actions of aggression against Israel go unpunished.

ZAKARIA: Do you think that Russia's involvement is potentially stabilizing or destabilizing?

NETANYAHU: I don't know. I think time will tell. But I did go to Moscow and spoke very candidly to President Putin and just told him exactly what I just told you. I said these are our policies. We don't want to go back to the days when, you know, Russia and Israel were in an adversarial position. I think we've changed the relationship. And it's, on the whole, good. It's not like the one we have with the United States. Nothing will ever equal that.

But we certainly don't want an adversarial relationship. So we agreed that in a few days’ time, our deputy chiefs of staff will meet to arrange deconfliction - to make sure that we don't bump into Iran. We have different goals. In Syria, I've defined my goals. They're to protect the security of my people and my country. Russia has different goals. But they shouldn't clash.

ZAKARIA: You are a man who has often spoken out against aggression, against, you know - particularly against small countries. One place you have been studiously quiet is Russia's - what many people call aggression against Crimea. And when you were asked about it, you said, well, I've got a lot on my plate. But you are an international statesman. What is your view of what Russia, what Vladimir Putin did in annexing Crimea?

NETANYAHU: We went along with the provisions that the American government put forward. I mean it's very clear we don't approve of this Russian action. But I think we're also cognizant of the fact that we have a - we're bordering Russia right now.

And we are - Israel is a strong country. It's a small strong country. But we also know that we have to make sure that we don't get into unnecessary conflicts. And we have - believe me, we have a lot on our plate. I went to Moscow to make it clear that we should avoid a clash between Russian forces and Israeli forces. That's about as responsible, I think, and statesmanly as I think we should act at this point.

ZAKARIA: What's your view of Putin?

NETANYAHU: Look, there's mutual respect, but that doesn't mean that we have mutual coherence of interests. It's not - it's not the relationship that we have with the United States of America. It never can be. But I think it's important that we make every effort right now to avoid a concussion.

///

ZAKARIA: When we come back, I will ask Prime Minister Netanyahu, the Iran nuclear deal’s biggest opponent, what if any options he has left.

[COMMERCIAL BREAK]

ZAKARIA: Back now to more of my interview with Israel’s Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, who was in New York this week for the UN General Assembly. ///

ZAKARIA: Prime Minister, let me show you a chart. You presented a graphic when you came to the UN, and you detailed exactly what was dangerous about Iran's quest to enrich uranium. And you said this was the key - how much enriched uranium they had. And you drew a line. So I'm going to show you this - this was the - the line you put. This is a chart put out by the White House. And they say, you are right, that Iran was at this point, the red line that you described. But, they say, with this deal, before the sanctions are lifted, Iran has to destroy 98 percent of its enriched uranium; of course, the plutonium pathway, which is the most common way, is blocked, and that the line would have to be drawn way down here.

So I'm asking you, are they right?

NETANYAHU: Look, I'm not going to rehash the deal. I summarized yesterday our main opposition. I didn’t go into the question of centrifuges or R&D or inspections…
ZAKARIA: But are they right? This seems to me - I mean, I asked experts, and they said, yes, if Iran does in the first year before the sanctions are lifted, what it is required to do, it goes - it goes way down.

NETANYAHU: Well, there are a lot of questions that will remain open on this question. But there's one that isn't, and that is that after year 10 and after year 15, all these limitations are lifted. And therefore, Iran will be free to get to the point where it's at the threshold level of producing the fissile material, the nuclear - the indispensable nuclear material, through enrichment, to make an arsenal of nuclear bombs.

ZAKARIA: But they're there right now, as per Bibi Netanyahu's speech two years ago.

NETANYAHU: But they were - but they were held back because of biting sanctions that are now going to be removed.

So I don't want to rehash this. And I was very clear about that. I didn't go into the details. I said, OK, now that it's done, let's look forward. Let's keep Iran's feet to the fire. Let's make sure that they keep all their obligations under the nuclear deal. That's the first thing.

Second thing - let's block Iran's other aggression in the region, because they're doing everything. They're trying to encircle Israel with a noose of death. They're sending weapons to the Houthis. They're in Iraq. They're in Afghanistan. They're all over the place. In Yemen, of course. Let's bolster those forces to stand up to Iran's aggression in the region, and none is stronger, none is more reliable than Israel. So I look forward to discussing President Obama's offer to bolster Israel's security when I visit the United States in November.

And the third thing I said - and I drew attention to something that is not well known - let's tear down Iran's global terror network. They're in over 30 countries. They're establishing terror cells in the Western Hemisphere alongside the Eastern Hemisphere. These are things that we agree on.

Yes, we had a disagreement in the family, as President Obama and I both said. But we have no disagreement about blocking Iran's aggression and working against its terrorism. And I think that's what we should focus on now.

ZAKARIA: Last week, Bill Clinton, on this program, said that he thought your speech to the United States Congress at the invitation of John Boehner was unprecedented. And I asked him then, was it unwise? He said, you'll have to ask Prime Minister Netanyahu that.

Was it unwise?

NETANYAHU: I'll ask you a question. If the President of the United States thought that a deal was being forged that would endanger the security and even the very survival of the United States, wouldn't you expect him to speak up at every place, at every forum?

And the answer is, of course you would. That was my obligation. Again, I don't think that we should rehash this. But I think we should focus on what we do agree must be done right now.

President Obama was - called me up at the time that the deal was being debated. And he said, I'd like to talk to you about bolstering Israel's security, about maintaining its qualitative military edge, about preventing things from going into Iran's proxies. Would you like to do that now, or would you like to do it later? And I said I'd like to do it later, the day after.

Well, today in my conversation with John Kerry, this is the day after. And we began that conversation. Our secretary - our minister of defense will be coming to Washington to meet Secretary Carter in a few weeks. And after that, I'll meet President Obama.

I look forward to discussing this with the President. I think it's a very important stage to help us face the challenges that we face.

ZAKARIA: If two years from now, Iran has, in fact, destroyed 98 percent of its en - highly enriched uranium, if the Fordow and Arak facilities have been rendered inoperable, will you call President Obama and say, you know what, maybe this worked a little better than I thought it did?

NETANYAHU: I'll be the happiest person in the world if my concerns prove to be wrong. I - you know, the opposite could also happen, you know.

But I think the issue right now is - it's a practical question right now. It's not an ideological question. It's not a political question. It's a practical question - do they keep the agreement?

And second, what happens 15 years from now, or 10 years from now, when they're basically absolved of any restrictions, which is the main point I've been making. Because, see, they get all these restrictions lifted regardless of their policy. If they continue their aggression...

ZAKARIA: But you get 15 years with no nuclear - with a non-nuclear Iran.

NETANYAHU: Well, assuming they don't cheat.

ZAKARIA: Right.

NETANYAHU: And second, you're also assuming that they would have gone on and continued in the face of very strong sanctions and a military threat. We can - we can argue that. But that's not my purpose now.

My purpose is to focus on what we do agree on. And we absolutely agree on the need to block Iran's aggression in the region. That was never part of the deal - that you let them have a free reign. And the second thing is how to bolster Israel's security, and, by the way, other allies that are facing this same Iranian threat.

And I'd also draw attention to their global terror network. That - these are things that we can concentrate on, and we agree on, and we should cooperate on, and we will cooperate on.  ///

ZAKARIA: When we come back, did any lingering hopes for Middle East peace just blow up at the UN this week? I’ll ask the Prime Minister when we come back.

[COMMERCIAL BREAK]

ZAKARIA: Prime Minister, you know that the Palestinian leader Mahmoud Abbas has said that he is essentially not going to follow the Oslo process - they will not abide by it any more. You mentioned it in your speech. I want to ask you, since it does feel like the peace process is dead, you know, if it ever had much life in it, about his son. There have been reports…

NETANYAHU: His son?

ZAKARIA: His son has - there are a couple of reports which talked about - a New York Times report, where he gave an interview, and he said, I'm not for my father's plan. I think the peace process is dead. I don't want a two-state solution. I want a one-state solution. I just want rights. I just want political rights. If you're not going to give me a state, give me political rights.

You know that there are other Palestinians who feel this way. In fact, there's Khalil Shikaki, a pollster, who say about a third of Palestinians now, and it is more for younger Palestinians, want just political rights. Will they get them?

NETANYAHU: Well, I think that the right solution is a demilitarized Palestinian state that recognizes the Jewish state. They want a Palestinian state; we have a Jewish state. We should have mutual recognition of these two nation states and provisions on the ground by which Israel can defend itself by itself. And I think that's eminently preferable to the idea of a unitary state, which I don't want.

I think the reason the peace process doesn't get - doesn't move forward is because the Palestinians have basically two provisions there. I mean, one is you've got to renounce terrorism and act against it. And unfortunately, that's not what they're doing. We just had, you know, a young mother and a young father brutally murdered by Palestinian terrorists - four little orphans in the back of the car. And President Abbas has yet to denounce this.

I mean, on the rare occasions that we have - and we do have, on certain occasions, acts of terrorism by Jews, we always go there like gangbusters. We condemn it. We do everything we can to find them and to fight them.

I expect President Abbas to do the same. So one is, you have to stop this incitement against Israel, because incitement leads to acts of terrorism. But the second thing is you've got to stay in the process. You've got to come and sit on the table.

ZAKARIA: Why not use this opportunity to make a bold counter offer, not just a process one, but an actual proposal for a Palestinian state?

NETANYAHU: Well, I've made several offers, but, you know, the only way - his offers and my offers obviously don't cohere - and I said, look, the only way you're going to do this is let's sit around the table. Here's the litmus test for you…

ZAKARIA: But he says the problem is you're building settlements, even in…

NETANYAHU: Well, I, you know…

ZAKARIA: - even in Area C…

NETANYAHU: - I think the problem is he's inciting terrorism. I think the problem is he's spreading lies about the Temple Mount and what we're doing there. We're the guardians of the Temple Mount - for God's sake, without Israel, you know, what’ll happen on those sacred sites would be what happened in Palmyra in Syria.

ZAKARIA: You…

NETANYAHU: But he - so I have complaints; he has complaints. There's only one way to get a peace process going, peace negotiations going - you've got to sit down and negotiate.

Yet in the seven years that I've been now in - sitting in the prime minister's office in Israel, we haven't had seven hours that he was willing to talk. And it's not because of me. The fact is, I'm willing to have this conversation. He's not.

ZAKARIA: Well he says you're creating facts on the ground...

NETANYAHU: Well so is he…

ZAKARIA: - by building settlements.

NETANYAHU: So is he. He's creating a lot of facts on the ground, and bad facts.

ZAKARIA: - OK, a last question.

You talked about terrorism against Palestinians, terrorism by Israelis. President - the president of Israel says - wonders - he posed this question, why is this culture of extremism flourishing in Israel right now? Do you think that there is an atmosphere that has - that has incited or allowed this kind of extremism to flourish?

NETANYAHU: No, I think the test is not whether societies have extremists; the question is what do the - what does the mainstream do about it. In our case, we go wild against them. Every part of our society unites against any example of terrorism in our midst.

But what I say in Ramallah is that President Abbas calls public squares in honor of mass murderers. And that's unfortunate - that's not - it's a tragedy, I think - for us and the Palestinians, too. The culture of peace, the culture of acceptance, a culture of diversity, you know, for women, for Christians, for gays and so on, is very much ingrained in our culture. And that's why we don't educate our people that we have to destroy the Palestinian. We want peace with the Palestinians. But for that, we have to sit down. And I think that's one order of the day.

And the other order of the day is what I said before. I think we have to protect ourselves against the rising tide of militant Islam - religious fanaticism that is threatening all of us. And Israel is there. It's standing in the breach. And I appreciate the fact that despite our disagreement on the Iran nuclear deal, both the supporters of the deal and the opponents of the deal, those who supported it, those who oppose it, they all agree now we have to strengthen Israel.

And I think that's the best guarantor of peace.

ZAKARIA: Prime Minister Netanyahu, thank you so much.

NETANYAHU: Thank you.  Thank you, Fareed.

### END ###


Topics: CNN • CNN International • Fareed Zakaria • Fareed Zakaria GPS • Iran • Israel • Russia • Syria • Ukraine
September 26th, 2015
07:59 AM ET

Former President Bill Clinton Interviewed by CNN’s Fareed Zakaria for Sunday's #FZGPS

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Former U.S. President Bill Clinton will appear on the Sunday, Sept. 27 edition of FAREED ZAKARIA GPS in a taped interview covering topics including the current presidential campaign, Hillary Clinton’s run for president, Donald Trump and the GOP brand, the civil war in Syria, good news on the United Nations’ development goals and Clinton Global Initiative accomplishments, the P5+1 nuclear deal with Iran, and Russia’s interventions in Ukraine.

The interview will air on FAREED ZAKARIA GPS on Sunday, Sept. 27, 2015, at 10:00am and 1:00pm, and on CNN/U.S. and at 7:00am and 3:00pm on CNN International.  All times Eastern.

###


Topics: 2016 Election • Africa • CNN • Iran • Israel
President Obama interviewed by Fareed Zakaria on Iran nuclear deal
August 7th, 2015
09:02 AM ET

President Obama interviewed by Fareed Zakaria on Iran nuclear deal

Please credit any usage to “CNN’s FAREED ZAKARIA GPS”

EXCERPT

This Sunday's CNN’s FAREED ZAKARIA GPS features an interview with President Barack Obama who presses his case for support of the nuclear deal negotiated between the U.S., its allies, and Iran, for a global exclusive interview in the Map Room at the White House. This interview marks the President’s first televised one-on-one since his Iran policy speech at American University in Washington, DC, on Wednesday.

MANDATORY CREDIT for reference and usage: “CNN’s FAREED ZAKARIA GPS”

Contacts: Jennifer Dargan: jennifer.dargan@turner.com; 202.515.2950; Ayanna Alexander: ayanna.alexander@turner.com; 202.772.2633

ADVANCE EXCERPT EMBARGOED FOR RELEASE UNTIL 8:05AM EASTERN

The full interview will air August 9, 2015 at 10am &1pm ET on CNN/U.S.:

Fareed Zakaria, host, Fareed Zakaria GPS: In your speech at American University you made a comparison, you said that Iran’s hardliners were making common cause with Republicans. It’s come under a lot of criticism. Mitch McConnell says even Democrats who oppose the deal should be insulted.

Barack Obama, President of the United States: What I said is absolutely true factually. The truth of the matter is, inside of Iran, the people most opposed to the deal are the Revolutionary Guard, the Quds force, hardliners who are implacably opposed to any cooperation with the international community. /// The reason that Mitch McConnell, and the rest of the folks in his caucus who opposed this jumped out and opposed this before they even read it, before it was even posted, is reflective of an ideological commitment not to get a deal done. In that sense they do have much more in common with the hardliners who are much more satisfied with the status quo.

Image:

http://i2.cdn.turner.com/cnn/2015/images/08/07/president.obama.-.fareed.zakaria.august.6.2015.jpg

P080615LJ-0027

President Barack Obama participates in an interview with Fareed Zakaria of CNN in the Map Room of the White House, Aug. 6, 2015. (Official White House Photo by Lawrence Jackson)

This official White House photograph is being made available only for publication by CNN and/or for personal use printing by the subject(s) of the photograph. The photograph may not be manipulated in any way and may not be used in commercial or political materials, advertisements, emails, products, promotions that in any way suggests approval or endorsement of the President, the First Family, or the White House.

 

## END ##

 

August 6th, 2015
10:26 AM ET

CNN’s Fareed Zakaria Interviews President Barack Obama

GPS graphic

FAREED ZAKARIA GPS Global Television Exclusive for Sunday, Aug. 09

President Barack Obama presses his case for support of the nuclear deal negotiated between the U.S., its allies, and Iran, when he sits down with CNN’s Fareed Zakaria for a global exclusive interview in the Map Room at the White House on Thursday, August 06. The interview will cover the high stakes domestic politics, and the issues in contention with other world powers.

This marks the President’s first televised one-on-one since his Iran policy speech at American University in Washington, DC, on Wednesday. The interview will air in its entirety on the network’s flagship world affairs program, FAREED ZAKARIA GPS on Sunday, August 09 on CNN/U.S.

AIRTIMES

In North America (all times Eastern):

  • CNN/U.S.: Sunday, Aug. 09 at 10:00a.m., encore at 1:00p.m.
  • CNN International: Saturday, Aug. 08 at 9:00p.m., encores on Sunday, Aug. 09 at 7:00a.m., encore at 3:00p.m. and 10:00p.m.

 ###

April 19th, 2015
01:24 PM ET

Webb: “looking hard” at White House run

Today on CNN’s State of the Union, Jim Sciutto spoke to former Senator Jim Webb (D-VA) in an exclusive interview covering his potential presidential bid and his views on the Iran deal.

FULL POST


Topics: CNN • Iran • Jim Sciutto • State of the Union
April 19th, 2015
11:52 AM ET

Cardin on Iran deal

The ranking member of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, Sen. Ben Cardin (D-MD), spoke to CNN's Jim Sciutto on State of the Union regarding the Iran nuclear negotiations. FULL POST


Topics: Iran • Jim Sciutto • State of the Union
April 19th, 2015
11:42 AM ET

Corker: Lynch vote coming in "the next 48 to 72 hours"

Today on CNN’s State of the Union, Jim Sciutto spoke to the chairman of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee, Sen. Bob Corker (R-TN), about the Iran nuclear deal and the nomination of Loretta Lynch. FULL POST


Topics: Iran • Jim Sciutto • State of the Union
April 7th, 2015
01:53 AM ET

Sen. Feinstein on Israeli PM Netanyahu "he has put out no real alternative"

On Sunday's edition of CNN's State of the Union, Senator Dianne Feinstein (D-CA) joined CNN’s Jim Acosta about Israeli’s Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, the Iranian nuclear deals, and the drought in California.

TEXT HIGHLIGHTS
Feinstein on Netanyahu: “this can backfire on him. And I wish that he would contain himself, because he has put out no real alternative, in his speech to the Congress, no real alternative, since then, no real alternative.”
Feinstein on the California drought: Well, I think our snowpack, which is a big source of spring runoff for the state, is at 8 percent of what it should be. That is an historic low.  I think it's very serious. We have, you know, close to 38 million people in this state. It's going to mean mandatory rationing. It's going to mean the fallowing of large amounts of agricultural land. It's going to mean being able to try to work our systems more efficiently. And it's a very, very serious problem. “
Feinstein on trusting Iran’s foreign minister Javad Zarif: “: I believe he is sincere. I believe that President Rouhani wants this. And it looks like the supreme leader will be agreeable. Now, having said that, we have got everybody jumping to conclusions in the Congress. This agreement has to be written up into a binding kind of agreement. And that's the document that we all need to see, the final document.”
 
TRANSCRIPT

FULL POST


Topics: Iran • Israel • Jim Acosta • State of the Union
April 7th, 2015
01:49 AM ET

Ben Rhodes: "we're not going to convince Prime Minister Netanyahu"

Sunday's edition of CNN’s FAREED ZAKARIA GPS featured an interview with Ben Rhodes, the Obama Administration’s deputy national security advisor for strategic communication, spoke to Fareed Zakaria about the Iranian nuclear deal.

TEXT EXCERPTS

Rhodes on concessions in the Iranian nuclear deal: “No, look, Fareed, we've always said that Iran would be able to access peaceful nuclear energy.  The question essentially is can we design a program with the Iranians and the p5+1 that could meet our bottom lines, and that's what this program does.  Because if you look at their Arak facility - they're not producing weapons grade plutonium.  If you're looking at their Fordow facility, they are not enriching uranium.  If you look at their Natanz facility, the only place where they will be enriching uranium, they're dramatically reducing the number of centrifuges that are operating and only operating their first-generation centrifuges.  That extends the breakout timeline, also in part because they'll be shipping their stockpile out of the country.  That goes from two to three months, the breakout timeline, to at least a year for ten years.  And there are additional limitations that continue.”

Rhodes on convincing Israeli Prime Minister Netanyahu: “I think that we're not going to convince Prime Minister Netanyahu.  Frankly, he's disagreed with this approach since before the joint plan of action, the first interim agreement that was reached with Iran.  But what we will say to Prime Minister Netanyahu, as we're saying to our Gulf partners too, is we're making a nuclear deal here.  It's the right thing to do.  It's the best way to prevent Iran from getting a nuclear weapon for the longest period of time.  At the same time, though, we're not at all lessening our concern about Iran's destabilizing actions in the region, its threat towards Israel and our other partners, its support for terrorism.  And we can have a dialogue with them about what else can we be doing to reassure you of our commitment to your security, to counter those types of destabilizing activities, and make clear that, again, while we may have a nuclear deal here, we're going to be very, very vigilant in confronting other Iranian actions in the region that concern us.  “

On GPS: What the Iran nuclear deal means for Israel
FULL POST


Topics: Fareed Zakaria • Fareed Zakaria GPS • Iran
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