The Orchard & CNN Films Acquire North American Rights to Shaul Schwarz's, Christina Clusiau's Documentary TROPHY at 2017 Sundance Film Festival
John Hume, the world’s largest rhino breeder, walks at his Buffalo Dream Ranch in North West Province, South Africa (November 2016)
January 24th, 2017
02:27 PM ET

The Orchard & CNN Films Acquire North American Rights to Shaul Schwarz's, Christina Clusiau's Documentary TROPHY at 2017 Sundance Film Festival

CNNFilms_LOGO_black_clean                  the-orchard_logo 

On the day of its world premiere at the 2017 Sundance Film Festival, The Orchard and CNN Films announced that they had acquired North American rights to Shaul Schwarz and Christina Clusiau's documentary TROPHY, produced by Lauren Haber, and Julia Nottingham of Pulse Films.

The Orchard will handle all North American rights except television.  CNN has acquired U.S. and Canadian television rights.  A studio is closing international rights to the film.  A startling exploration of the evolving relationship between big-game hunting and wildlife conservation, TROPHY screens at the festival in U.S. Documentary Competition.  The Orchard will release the film later this year on a minimum of 150 screens.

Endangered African species like elephants, rhinos and lions march closer to extinction each year.  Their devastating decline is fueled in part by a global desire to consume these majestic animals.  TROPHY investigates the powerhouse industries of big-game hunting, breeding and wildlife conservation.  Through the eyes of impassioned individuals who drive these industries—from a Texas-based trophy hunter to the world’s largest private rhino breeder in South Africa—the film grapples with the consequences of imposing economic value on animals.  What are the implications of treating animals as commodities?  Do breeding, farming and hunting offer some of the few remaining options to conserve our endangered animals?  TROPHY will leave viewers debating what is right, what is wrong and what is necessary in order to save the great species of the world. FULL POST

Girls will ‘Rise Up’ with First Lady Michelle Obama, Meryl Streep, Freida Pinto, Andra Day, Isha Sesay and CNN Films for October
September 21st, 2016
04:49 PM ET

Girls will ‘Rise Up’ with First Lady Michelle Obama, Meryl Streep, Freida Pinto, Andra Day, Isha Sesay and CNN Films for October

Global Broadcasts of ‘We Will Rise: Michelle Obama’s Mission to Educate

Girls Around the World’ for the International Day of the Girl Begin Oct. 11

CNN Films is producing a new film about girls overcoming incredible challenges to achieve their educations and change their own lives, with contributions from First Lady Michelle Obama, Meryl Streep, Freida Pinto, and CNN journalist Isha Sesay. Singer Andra Day’s motivational anthem, ‘Rise Up’ will serve as the theme for the film. The Documentary Group, which produced CNN Films’ first co-production, ‘Girl Rising,’ also produced this special one-hour film.

We Will Rise: Michelle Obama’s Mission to Educate Girls Around the World featuring Meryl Streep, Freida Pinto, and Isha Sesay will premiere on CNN International on the International Day of the Girl during primetime in Asia, Europe, and Africa on Tuesday, Oct. 11 at 6:00am, 12:00pm, and 3:00pm. All times Eastern.

The CNN/U.S. premiere on Wednesday, Oct. 12 at 9:00pm will simulcast on CNN International; We Will Rise: Michelle Obama’s Mission to Educate Girls Around the World will encore Thursday, Oct. 13 at 12:00am. The film will premiere on HLN on Saturday, Oct. 15 at 12:00pm. All times Eastern. The film will premiere on CNN en Español on Saturday, Nov. 5, viewers are asked to check local listings for exact airtimes. FULL POST

October 18th, 2015
12:38 PM ET

President Kenyatta on gay rights in Kenya

On today’s FAREED ZAKARIA GPS (10:00am and 1:00pm in North America) Kenya's President Uhuru Kenyatta spoke about domestic homeland security and the state of rights for homosexuals in Kenya.

MANDATORY CREDIT for reference and usage: “CNN’s FAREED ZAKARIA GPS”

FULL INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPT

THIS IS A RUSH TRANSCRIPT. THIS COPY MAY NOT BE IN ITS FINAL FORM AND MAY BE UPDATED.

FAREED ZAKARIA, HOST:  The East African nation of Kenya has seen great highs and great lows of late. In April, Al Shabaab militants stormed across the porous border from Somalia and killed almost 150 people at a Kenyan university. That followed the infamous Westgate Mall siege – also by Al Shabaab – that killed 67 people and lasted 4 days. In July, President Obama made his first trip as President to his father's native land. In the weeks leading up the President's arrival, the U.S. conducted drone strikes against Al Shabaab in their sanctuary of Somalia. I recently had the chance to sit down with Kenya's President Uhuru Kenyatta to discuss terror, economics, and playing host to President Obama.

ZAKARIA: President Kenyatta, pleasure to have you on.

UHURU KENYATTA, PRESIDENT OF KENYA: Happy to see you.

ZAKARIA: Let's talk first about terrorism. The world has been astonished over the last few years to see the rise of – first it was Al Qaeda type affiliates, now it appears to be ISIS type affiliates in Africa, Why is this happening?

KENYATTA: I think the best way to put this is that this is really, this is an argument I've been putting, this is not really a Kenyan situation. You've first of all got to recognize the neighborhood that we live in. You know we had a failed state right next to our border, a state where there was no rule of law, there was no government, it was just open vastland. So when Al Qaeda sort of took root and they didn't take root in Kenya, they found in Somalia, a haven where they could do their training, they could do almost anything.

ZAKARIA: You must have studied though this issue of why some Muslims get radicalized because you have a Muslim population in Kenya and some have gotten radicalized. You must look at Boko Haram in Nigeria and think about the same thing.  What is the answer? What is – what seems to be attractive to young men particularly?

KENYATTA: One let's put it that first and foremost let's say that there may be genuine grievances, they may have.

But then on top of it you've got this group of radical preachers who come and give a very warped view of religion you know at Friday – at Friday Mosque. You know start telling them that what you're doing you know you're doing for god, you're doing for you know, it's for your religion and for God, right?

Now this is what we've really got to focus ourselves on. You know how do you make this not so attractive? We got to start creating the Muslim leadership in the world to start saying “no” Boko Haram, Al-Shabaab, Al-Qaeda do not represent the true faith; this is the true faith.

ZAKARIA: Let me ask you about economics. For a while Africa was seen as this great hope but a lot of investors I talk to and a lot of businessmen say much of the reform that they had hoped would take place in Africa has stalled.

Because at the – you know between corruption and dysfunction and bad government there is still so much of it in Africa that it's blocking progress. Would you agree with that?

KENYATTA: I would look at it differently. I would look at it and say that the African renaissance is still on. I would say that yes indeed we do have challenges and challenges have been there. There is actual true realization that we need to reform our system to match the growth and to sustain the growth trajectory that we've taken.

This is why Kenyans chose for themselves a new constitution in 2010 that sought to reorganize the way we manage our business as a country. That's why they removed certain powers from the President, and gave them to independent institutions to remove that personality driven cult that one man controls the entire system.  And I believe this is working.

ZAKARIA: But people still say you are supremely powerful, you personally.

KENYATTA: Well I don't know about supremely powerful but if you – if you actually look at the situation that we have today in Kenya and compare it to where we were before that is actually you know not the case. I have no power to appoint or fire judges any more. Really my role is more or less an understand of saying that whatever the commission does you know the judiciary has gained its independence.

The same applies to the legislature. Now where the issue of power comes from is where they say oh but you control Parliament. But yes it's true, we have a majority in Parliament, we have that majority because the people chose to give that majority to the party to which I belong to.

ZAKARIA: When people talk about gay rights to you and President Obama did this on his visit there. You say look, we have our culture we have our traditions, don't try to impose your values on us. The problem for many in the west is that it's not really seen as a matter of cultural values it's seen as a matter of innate human rights that these people are – you know that you are in effect depriving people of their rights merely because of something that is God-given. That is – that they were born with, that there is increasing scientific evidence that this is the case. And why would you persecute people for something that they have ultimately no control over?

KENYATTA: Let me make it clear to you and put it this way, right. I think first and foremost we're all saying that whatever society you come from right, the principal aim is that you must give the people you know their right to choose, all right?

Now where we are and at the level of development that we are in, I am not saying that these people don't have their rights, that's not what I'm saying. I am just saying that the majority – the majority in our society yes, do not wish to legalize, yes, this issue of gay rights.

ZAKARIA: Can you persuade them?

KENYATTA: The people in Kenya are not, at this point in time, and that's exactly what I said when we were with President Obama, yes. To them this is not an issue that they are going to put at the center. They have more pressing issues.

However, that said and done I am also, right, and will not allow people to persecute any individuals yes. Or just to beat them, or to you know torture them, you know.

ZAKARIA: But you do allow persecution because they're – because they're criminalized.

KENYATTA: What I'm saying witch hunts - what I am saying is witch hunts. You know we won't allow people to take the law into their own hands and harass and no we won't. All right. Every individual has a right to be protected by the law and that's stated in our constitution, all right.

But what we are saying is that as a society, right, we do not accept some of these values, right. And this is where I am saying we have to get synergies. You’re not going to create the United States or Great Britain or the Netherlands in Kenya, or in Nigeria or Senegal overnight. We have to understand that these are processes and they take time.

ZAKARIA: President Kenyatta, pleasure to have you on.

KENYATTA: Been great.

END

September 26th, 2015
07:59 AM ET

Former President Bill Clinton Interviewed by CNN’s Fareed Zakaria for Sunday's #FZGPS

IMG_3738

Former U.S. President Bill Clinton will appear on the Sunday, Sept. 27 edition of FAREED ZAKARIA GPS in a taped interview covering topics including the current presidential campaign, Hillary Clinton’s run for president, Donald Trump and the GOP brand, the civil war in Syria, good news on the United Nations’ development goals and Clinton Global Initiative accomplishments, the P5+1 nuclear deal with Iran, and Russia’s interventions in Ukraine.

The interview will air on FAREED ZAKARIA GPS on Sunday, Sept. 27, 2015, at 10:00am and 1:00pm, and on CNN/U.S. and at 7:00am and 3:00pm on CNN International.  All times Eastern.

###


Topics: 2016 Election • Africa • CNN • Iran • Israel
October 19th, 2014
01:27 PM ET

NIH Director "No further cases" of Ebola in US

Today on CNN’s State of the Union with Candy Crowley, Dr. Anthony Fauci, director the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases at the National Institutes of Health, joins Candy Crowley to discuss the fight against Ebola in the US.

Text highlights, video, and a transcript of the discussion are below

TEXT HIGHLIGHTS

Fauci on a travel ban: “It would be very, very difficult if you lost control of easily tracking people.  You have got to look at the numbers to look about how many people are really trying to get into the country. We have 36,000 people in two months went to airports to get out of those three countries; 77 were blocked because of a health issue. When they investigated them, none of them had Ebola. A lot of them had malaria.  So, there's not a lot of people trying to get into the country.”

Fauci on known Ebola cases in the US: “No further cases. Just the two infections. So, we have two infections that have occurred here in the United States.”

A full transcript of the interview is available after the jump.

  FULL POST

August 5th, 2013
04:47 PM ET

Chelsea Clinton talks to CNN's Nima Elbagir

CNN's Nima Elbagir (@nimacnn) spoke exclusively to Chelsea Clinton Monday in Rwanda, where the daughter of former U.S. President Bill Clinton and former U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton is in the midst of a nine-day, six-stop African trip with her father. Clinton admits she's still not ruling out a future run for office.

On running for office
"Not now. I'm so grateful for the work I'm able to do in places like Rwanda – I know that I'm making a difference. I'm also grateful to live in a city and a state and a country where I really believe in my elected officials, and their ethos and their competencies. Someday, if either of those weren't true, and I thought I could make more of a difference in the public sector, or if I didn't like how my city or state or country were being run, I'd have to ask and answer that question."

On leading a public life
"I hear my grandmother's voice in my head every day that life is not about what happens to you, but about what you do with what happens to you. I had very much led a deliberately private life for a long time, and now I'm attempting to lead a perfectly public life."

Image after the jump.

FULL POST


Topics: Africa • Nima Elbagir
March 4th, 2013
05:18 PM ET

CNN Exclusive: Nima Elbagir interviews Kenya's Prime Minister

CNN's Nairobi-based correspondent Nima Elbagir (@NimaCNN) speaks exclusively to Kenya's Prime Minister Raila Odinga, who is one of eight contenders vying for the country's presidency.


Topics: Africa • Nima Elbagir
September 21st, 2012
10:04 AM ET

CNN Worldwide Announces New Freedom Project Programming for Second Year

Collaboration with NGOs Helps Free Trafficked Persons

As CNN Worldwide marks the first year of the CNN Freedom Project, the network today announced a sweeping slate of new digital and television journalism for the project for the second half of 2012.  Launched in mid-2011, the CNN Freedom Project shines light on the efforts of individuals and organizations working to fight the injustices of forced labor, sex trafficking, unauthorized organ harvesting, and other forms of human trafficking in the United States and around the world.

“The CNN Freedom Project marked a decision by our news organization to take a stand on an issue,” said Tony Maddox, executive vice president and managing director of CNN International.  “As journalists, we have resisted taking positions, but with our global resources, how could CNN not be involved in raising awareness to these horrible injustices?  And, through our collaborations with heroic NGOs working in these areas, we have pushed for change and are seeing tangible results: more than 1,000 people found freedom following a CNN Freedom Project story.”

FULL POST

September 13th, 2012
05:50 PM ET

Prime Minister of Libya: "arrests have been made"

In his first interview since being newly elected Prime Minister Mustafa Abushagur of Libya CNN's Christiane Amanpour spoke to Mr. Abushagur about the murders of four American diplomats in Benghazi on Tuesday, September 11, 2012, including Ambassador J. Christopher Stevens.

Prime Minister Abushagur confirmed that the first "arrests have been made" – and that the investigation into other people who may have been involved in the murder is ongoing.  He acknowledged that authorities in Libya are also investigating whether the assault on the American consulate was the result of organized "extremist" groups.

On behalf of his nation, the Prime Minister also offered condolences to the families of the murdered diplomats and to the American people.

Amanpour airs weekdays on CNN International at 3:00pm with a replay at 5:00pm Eastern in the U.S.   The full transcript for this edition of this program is available here.  In Europe, Amanpour airs on CNN Internatioanl at 21:00 CET, with a replay at 23:00 CET.

###

September 12th, 2012
05:42 PM ET

Libyan Ambassador on Amanpour: "it is a great loss"

CNN's Christiane Amanpour interviewed Libyan Ambassador Ali Suleiman Aujali about the murders of four American diplomats in Benghazi, Libya, on Tuesday, September 11, 2012, including the American ambassador to Libya, J. Christopher Stevens.  Ambassador Aujali offered his condolences to the family of the murdered diplomats and to the American people.

Specifically Ambassador Aujali described the murder of Ambassador Stevens as, "a great loss for the Libyan people" saying that Stevens had been a friend and was "the right man, at the right place, at the right time....he was welcomed at every place he went in Libya..."

Christiane Amanpour will join Anderson Cooper at 8:00pm ET this evening on Anderson Cooper 360° this evening on CNN/U.S.

Amanpour airs weekdays on CNN International at 3:00pm with a replay at 5:00pm Eastern in the U.S.   The full transcript for this edition of this program is available here.  In Europe, Amanpour airs on CNN Internatioanl at 21:00 CET, with a replay at 23:00 CET.

###

tmpl
« older posts