December 14th, 2014
01:19 PM ET

Israeli econ minister, "I will not give up land to Arabs anymore."

CNN’s FAREED ZAKARIA GPS features an interview with Naftali Bennett, the economic minister in Prime Minister Netanyahu's cabinet and the leader of the ultra-conservative Jewish Home party, to discuss the Israeli elections, Palestinian statehood, and European divestment of Israel.

TEXT EXCERPTS

On rejecting the establishment of a Palestinian state: The notion of injecting a state, dividing Jerusalem, dividing up the country and splitting and slicing it, is not sustainable. When we did it in Gaza, we gave them Gaza, right? And it turned into a terrible Afghanistan in the middle of Israel. We can't do it again. We can't commit suicide. We have to be more rational about things.”

On European divestment of Israel: “The boycott and divestment against Israel, in my opinion, is simply anti-Semitism, because we're the only country that takes care of its minorities, the only country where everyone can vote, Arabs and Jews. We're not cutting off heads. We allow women to drive, not like in other Arab countries. So to pinpoint the Jewish state as a - as a target for a boycott and divestment is blatant anti-Semitism. And I have no sympathy for that.”

Full transcript after the jump. FULL POST

December 7th, 2014
11:48 AM ET

Suki Kim's Experience in North Korea "it's the most horrific place to me in the world"

CNN’s FAREED ZAKARIA GPS features an interview with Suki Kim who explains how she got inside a North Korean school and the warped worldview of students there.

TEXT EXCERPT

On North Koreans’ perception of the world:  "They, first of all, didn't know anything about the rest of the world. If any of them did, they were fearful to admit that, because every conversation that we had, even at meals in the cafeteria, there was - somebody was reporting on it. They were all watching each other. And if they were curious, you know, there was a - little slips here and there where they would be curious about democracy, for example, how it functioned in the rest of the world. At the same time, some of the students really thought people spoke Korean in the rest of the world. So the utter, utter lack of information was astounding."

On North Korea's education system: "You take away any way of critical thinking, and you literally take away the tools where people can communicate with each other, then I think that you have a nation where they just basically have the most abusive nation in the world. There - these men just own their people. It's the most horrific place to me in the world

 

Full transcript after the jump. FULL POST

December 7th, 2014
11:37 AM ET

Candy Crowley's Exclusive Interview with George W. Bush

The 43rd President of the United States, George W. Bush, joins CNN's State of the Union for an in-depth interview ranging from childhood experiences to United States policy.

Candy Crowley sat down with President Bush earlier this week at Moody Air Force Base in Georgia to discuss the legacy of President George H.W. Bush which is the subject of his new book, 41: A Portrait of My Father. In addition, he weighed in on Jeb Bush's prospects for 2016, his relationship with the Clinton family, and race relations in the United States. President Bush stated that despite his close relationship with the Clintons, his brother Jeb would "absolutely" beat Hillary in the 2016 elections. According to the former president, race relations have improved but it is still sad to see race as "an emotional, divisive part of life." The former president also shared his views on Vladimir Putin, a man he once fished with, and the situation in Iraq.

TEXT HIGHLIGHTS

On Putin, his former fishing partner: “Well, I think he's become more zero-sum type thinker.  In other words, I don't - haven't talked to him in years, but it's almost as if he says that if the - if the West wins, I lose.  And if I win, the West loses.  As opposed to what can we do together to enhance our respective positions?”

On race relations in the United States and protests in New York:  “I thought: how sad.  The verdict was hard to understand, but I hadn't seen all the details.  But it's sad that race continues to play such a, you know, kind of emotional, divisive part of life.  I remember back in when I was a kid, in the '70s, and there was race riots with cities being burned.  And I just think we've improved.  I had dinner with Condi the other night and we talked about this subject, and, yes, she just said you got understand that there are a lot of, you know, black folks around that are just incredibly more and more distrusting of law enforcement.  Which is a shame, because law enforcement's job is to protect everybody.

On ISIS and Iraq: “first thing is there has to be a goal, and the president has laid out what I think is a good goal, and that is to degrade and defeat ISIS.  Once you state the goal, then you have to put plans in place to achieve the goal.  And seems like to me the initial plans are being adjusted, and all I hope is that we succeed, because ISIS is lethal.  They're lethal not only for the people in the neighborhoods in which they live; they're lethal to our security.”

On Bush 41’s advice before and during Bush 43’s presidency: “he didn't want to steer us.  Not only in our career choices but once we had made choices on how to - on how to make decisions, in my case. Now, if I ever wanted advice, of course he was always there.  And I tried - it's hard for people to understand.  I fully understand that.  But I hope when people read this, and I hope they do, is that they understand that when he reached across and grabbed my arm after the speech on September the 14 in the National Cathedral, I mean, incredibly emotional moment for me, it was in many ways symbolic of what he'd meant for me as president.  In other words, he was a comforter.  A lot.  Because he had been through what I was going through and he knew that he - you know, each president has to make up their own mind.  They have to develop their own team of people they trust.  He knew that he got a lot of advice as president, a lot of it not grounded in knowledge, and that - and so he was confident I had a good team and that I would make decisions based upon good judgments of a lot of good advisers.”

Full transcript after the jump. FULL POST

December 3rd, 2014
05:11 PM ET

CNN team gets first-hand look inside Syrian city of Kobani

A CNN team comprised of senior international correspondent Nick Paton Walsh (@npwcnn), producer Raja Razek and cameraman Scott McWhinnie gained exclusive access to the front lines in Kobani, Syria.

Escorted by female Kurdish fighters, Walsh and his team witnessed firsthand the intensity of the battle with ISIS, particularly on the eastern front.

5p CNNi Europe Aircheck


Topics: Nick Paton Walsh • Syria
November 16th, 2014
11:14 AM ET

Jon Stewart & Maziar Bahari on Fareed Zakaria GPS

CNN’s FAREED ZAKARIA GPS features an interview with Jon Stewart and Iranian-born journalist Maziar Bahari to discuss Iran, the Arab Spring, and their new film Rosewater. In 2009 Maziar Bahari was arrested under the pretext of espionage following the election of President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad and the Green Revolution. The film Rosewater depicts the 118 days of Bahari’s mental and physical torture under the Iranian regime. Jon Stewart, director of Rosewater, tells Fareed Zakaria that he feels many people are trapped between authoritarianism and religious extremism. He points to the Iranian regime’s shortsighted approach to retaining power. Both Bahari and Stewart describe the rationality of the Iranian regime’s irrationality, which was fundamental to Bahari’s detention after the Green Movement. Text excerpts and a full interview transcript are available below.

TEXT EXCERPT

Stewart on torture in Iran: “I think there is a rationality behind it. And to view it in that way means it can be manipulated. And it means that you can fight back against it. And so there is a banality to it. There is a - I would consider it more the bureaucracy of evil and the stupidity of evil.”

Stewart on the Arab World: “this is a part of the world that has been trapped between authoritarianism and extremism. And it's very difficult for the majority of the people who live there, who are just looking to carve out a little space for themselves and to live their lives, to get that space and create those civic institutions when you are constantly trapped between those two poles.”

Bahari on his experience in solitary confinement: “your only way to communicate with the rest of the world is through your interrogator. But when my interrogate - my - one of the prison guards, by mistake, called me Mr. Hillary Clinton, there and then I realized that there is a campaign for me. So I - that was the best moment for - for a prisoner, the worst thing is to think that he or she is alone. And that was a moment that I realized that I was not alone.”

Bahari on the principles and outcomes of the 2009 Green Movement: “It was a movement of millions of Iranians to gain their rights as citizens of the country. They did not want to be the subjects of the master, the supreme leader, Ayatollah Khamenei. So the movement continues. You may not see the manifestations of the movement on the streets, but the people’s demand to be considered as citizens of the country continues.”

A full interview of the transcript is available after the jump. FULL POST


Topics: Fareed Zakaria • Fareed Zakaria GPS • Iran
CNN takes three AIB awards, Richard Quest named TV Personality of the Year
(Left to right) Richard Quest, London Bureau Chief Tommy Evans & Moscow Correspondent Phil Black
November 5th, 2014
06:28 PM ET

CNN takes three AIB awards, Richard Quest named TV Personality of the Year

CNN celebrated three wins at the 2014 Association for International Broadcasting awards, hosted at the LSO St Luke’s in London on Wednesday night.

For the second year running, CNN was awarded the prize for best ‘Live Television Journalism’, this time for its reporting on the downing of Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 over Ukraine.

CNN also won in the 'Short News Report’ category for its coverage of a shooting which took place during clashes between Ukrainian security forces and protestors in Kiev’s Independence Square.

The climax of the evening, however, was the naming of Richard Quest as the 'Television Personality of the Year.' Quest, whose dynamic and distinctive style has made him a unique figure in the field of business broadcasting, was at the ceremony to personally receive the award. FULL POST

November 2nd, 2014
11:32 AM ET

Senator Rand Paul "the party has to change"

 

Today on CNN’s State of the Union with Candy Crowley, Senator Rand Paul (R-KY) speaks to Candy Crowley from the campaign trail about his hopes for shifting the balance of power in the Senate towards a Republican majority on Tuesday, the Ebola quarantine, and the 2016 presidential election.

Text highlights and a transcript of the discussion are below.

TEXT HIGHLIGHTS

On the Republican brand’s appeal to minorities: “Our brand is so broken that we can’t even break through that wall that’s out there.”

On President Obama guaranteeing GOP success in the midterm elections: “I think the wind's at our back. I think this election is going to be a referendum on the president. Even he acknowledged his policies will be on the ballot. And he will be indirectly on the ballot and there's a great deal of unhappiness that feels like our country, that he promised he would be beyond things, that he was going to be a uniter, not a divider.”

On campaigning for the GOP:  “I won't deny that it would help me if I do decide to run for president, to travel to 32 states and to be part of helping the Republican team on board. But I also do it because whether I run or not - and I haven't decided - but whether I run or not, I do want the Republican Party to be bigger and more successful because I think our philosophy will help the country more.”

On an Ebola quarantine: “the Libertarian in me is sort of horrified at the indefinitely detaining or retaining anyone without a trial.”

A full transcript is available after the jump. FULL POST

October 26th, 2014
12:28 PM ET

Quarantined nurse slams new policy

Kaci Hickox, a nurse placed under mandatory quarantine in New Jersey, told CNN today the "knee-jerk reaction by politicians" was not well planned out, "and to quarantine someone without a better plan in place, without more forethought, is just preposterous."

Hickox, who was working to help treat Ebola patients in Sierra Leone, has tested negative twice for Ebola and does not have symptoms, she said.

"This is an extreme that is really unacceptable and I feel like my basic human rights have been violated," Hickox told CNN's Candy Crowley on "State of the Union."

"To put me through this emotional and physical stress is completely unacceptable," she said. FULL POST

October 19th, 2014
01:39 PM ET

Cruz, a flight ban is a “basic, common-sense step"

Today on CNN’s State of the Union with Candy Crowley, Senator Ted Cruz (R-TX) responds to President Obama’s appointment of veteran Washington operative Ron Klain and demands the President lead the country by banning flights and securing the border. Senator Cruz asserts that supporting the Kurdish Peshmerga is essential to defeating ISIS and expresses his confidence in Republicans achieving a majority in both chambers of Congress.

TEXT HIGHLIGHTS

Cruz on the Obama Administration’s response to Ebola: "The biggest mistake that continues to be made is now, more than two weeks into this we continue to allow open commercial air flights from countries that have been stricken by Ebola. That doesn't make any sense, we have upwards of 150 people a day coming from countries with live, active Ebola outbreaks."

Cruz on the appointment of Ron Klain: “we should be less concerned about giving the public the feeling that the government is on top of this and more concerned about the government actually being on top of it. And this is a manifestation. We don't need another White House political operative, which is what Mr. Klain has been.”

Cruz on his support of the Kurdish Peshmerga: “the Obama administration keeps focusing on Syrian rebels, many of whom have far too close ties to radical Islamic terrorists for it to make any sense for us to be supporting them. The Kurds are allies and they are boots on the ground. And when we work with them in concert, they're ready to fight on the front line, along with serious airpower.”

Cruz on Republican success in the 2014 midterm elections: “I think it is far more likely than not that we will retake the Senate and retire Harry Reid.”

A full transcript of the interview is available after the jump.

  FULL POST

October 19th, 2014
01:27 PM ET

NIH Director "No further cases" of Ebola in US

Today on CNN’s State of the Union with Candy Crowley, Dr. Anthony Fauci, director the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases at the National Institutes of Health, joins Candy Crowley to discuss the fight against Ebola in the US.

Text highlights, video, and a transcript of the discussion are below

TEXT HIGHLIGHTS

Fauci on a travel ban: “It would be very, very difficult if you lost control of easily tracking people.  You have got to look at the numbers to look about how many people are really trying to get into the country. We have 36,000 people in two months went to airports to get out of those three countries; 77 were blocked because of a health issue. When they investigated them, none of them had Ebola. A lot of them had malaria.  So, there's not a lot of people trying to get into the country.”

Fauci on known Ebola cases in the US: “No further cases. Just the two infections. So, we have two infections that have occurred here in the United States.”

A full transcript of the interview is available after the jump.

  FULL POST

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