Schneider Electric promotes sustainability credentials through sponsorship association with CNN International’s COP21 digital content
November 30th, 2015
05:15 AM ET

Schneider Electric promotes sustainability credentials through sponsorship association with CNN International’s COP21 digital content

Schneider Electric is embarking on an advertising and branded content campaign exclusively on CNN International platforms to promote the company’s commitment to efficient and sustainable energy.

The campaign for the global energy management and automation specialist coincides with landmark climate conference COP21 taking place in Paris in December 2015. To maximise the engagement with CNN audiences of opinion leaders and global decision makers, the digital campaign includes Schneider Electric’s exclusive sponsorship of CNN International’s Two Degrees content, an innovative digital hub about environmental sustainability, examining through video, written content and infographics what will happen if the Earth’s climate were to warm more than two degrees Celsius. FULL POST


Topics: CNN
November 29th, 2015
01:45 PM ET

Carson: The Syrian refugee camps "are really quite nice"

SOTU

Today on CNN’s State of the Union, republican presidential nominee Dr. Ben Carson, joined anchor, Brianna Keilar to discuss his recent trip to Syria and the Colorado Springs shooting.

 

For more information, see http://cnnpressroom.blogs.cnn.com/. Also, text highlights and a transcript of the discussion are below.

 

MANDATORY CREDIT: CNN’s “State of the Union”

 

Contacts: Lauren Pratapas — Lauren.Pratapas@turner.com; 202.465.6666; Zachary Lilly – Zachary.Lilly@turner.com

 

TEXT HIGHLIGHTS

 

Carson on the Syrian refugee camps: “Yes their desire, their true desire is to be resettled in Syria. But they are satisfied to be in the refugee camps if the refugee camps are adequately funded. Recognize that in these camps they have schools, they have recreational facilities that are really quite nice. And their all kind of things that make life more tolerable. Would it be better to integrate them into society? Yes, and I’ve certainly talked to some people about that. But you have to make progress as you go.”

 

Carson responds to the Colorado Springs shooting: “It’s certainly is an act of extreme hatred and violence. The family research council according to some government agencies is a terrorist group so let’s get away from the rhetoric and talk about the real problem. The real problem is that we have become coarse and hateful toward each other we’ve allowed the purveyors of division to put us in separate corners and have us hurl hand grenades at each other rather than being able to sit down at a table and talk about our differences. In a pluralistic society everyone isn’t going to agree but the way that we can create harmony is to be able to actually sit down discuss the rational for our approaches and work together at finding a solution that’s what we really should be thinking about.”

FULL POST

November 29th, 2015
12:02 PM ET

Hickenlooper: "I’m not willing to say…sit back and accept this as a cost of freedom”

SOTU

Today on CNN’s State of the Union, Governor of Colorado John Hickenlooper, joined anchor, Brianna Keilar.

 

For more information, see http://cnnpressroom.blogs.cnn.com/. Also, text highlights and a transcript of the discussion are below.

 

MANDATORY CREDIT: CNN’s “State of the Union”

 

Contacts: Lauren Pratapas — Lauren.Pratapas@turner.com; 202.465.6666; Zachary Lilly – Zachary.Lilly@turner.com

 

 

TEXT HIGHLIGHTS

 

Hickenlooper on the shooting in Colorado Springs: “I believe one was a woman.  One was a man. But I don't think - I think that misses the point to try and get into whether the perpetrator - and I - to be honest, I don't even like saying the guy's name.  I don't like making these mass killers into celebrities of some sort, some twisted way. But I don't - whether he was successful or not is beyond the point.  It's - that he was trying to do this is - I don't know - I mean, it's a very, very hard reality to understand and get our arms around it. And, in Colorado, we passed universal background checks.  But, at the same time, in Colorado Springs, it's one of the more conservative parts of the state.  We probably have more people that have licenses for concealed weapons, probably more guns around.  That didn't help. I think, as a - as a state, but as a country, we have got a lot more thinking about this, of how to make sure we keep guns out of the hands of people that are unstable.”

 

Hickenlooper on gun control:  “Well, I think, I mean, we're still - Colorado Springs and I think the whole country is still grieving on this, so, you know, detailed plans probably aren't appropriate. But I think we have to come back and look at all aspects of why these shootings have continued to occur, you know, in Oregon or South Carolina and Colorado.  The frequency is unacceptable.  And I don't - you know, I'm not willing to say, well, we will just have to set - sit back and accept this as a cost of freedom. I think we have to really look at, how do we address - you know, how do we make sure that people have - who are unstable, who have violent histories, you know, if somehow - if a level of domestic violence made it much more difficult to get a weapon, maybe we would not only keep our communities safer, but also cut down on domestic violence at the time.”

 

Hickenlooper responds to categorizing the Colorado Springs shooting as terrorism: “Well, certainly it's - it is a form of terrorism, and maybe in some way, it's a function of the inflammatory rhetoric that we see on all - I mean, so many issues now, there are bloggers, and, you know, talk shows where they really focus on trying to get people to that point of boiling over and just intense anger. And I think maybe it's time to look at, how do we tone down some of that rhetoric?  Obviously, no one is going to try and reduce free speech in this country, but that rhetoric clearly is - if people are in some way emotionally unstable or psychologically unbalanced, that intensity of rhetoric sometimes seems to pull a trigger in their brain that they lose contact with what reality is.”

 

FULL POST

November 29th, 2015
11:59 AM ET

McCaul on finding Abdeslam: "I do think they're closing in on him, and that's the good news"

SOTU

Today on CNN’s State of the Union, Congressman and chairman of the Homeland Security Committee Michael McCaul, joined anchor, Brianna Keilar.

 

For more information, see http://cnnpressroom.blogs.cnn.com/. Also, text highlights and a transcript of the discussion are below.

 

MANDATORY CREDIT: CNN’s “State of the Union”

 

Contacts: Lauren Pratapas — Lauren.Pratapas@turner.com; 202.465.6666; Zachary Lilly – Zachary.Lilly@turner.com

 

TEXT HIGHLIGHTS

 

McCaul on the investigation into finding Abdeslam: “I do think they're closing in on him, and that's the good news.  There are many involved in this plot.  It was a very sophisticated plot, an external operation that we have seen from ISIS.  You mentioned the bombing of the Russian airliner.  This is a new ISIS, a new chapter, for them to be able to conduct three external operations in just recent times… I don't want to jeopardize an ongoing investigation that is so important. And, look, you know, Belgium, Paris, they have rounded up a lot of suspects right now.  They're really cracking down on security, as they should.  Europe is so wide-open, Brianna, because they had 5,000 Europeans that have gone to Iraq and Syria with Western passports, many of whom have come back.”

 

McCaul on the threat of terror attacks in the United States: “I'm very concerned about this.  You know, we have ramped up security at last points of destination.  Those are direct flights into the United States.

But, Brianna, what happened at Sharm el-Sheikh was an insider threat.  This is one where someone is compromised or radicalized or perhaps bribed to put a piece of luggage, put a bomb on an airplane that is a worker at the airport. So we can have the best screening technology, but if we have an insider threat out there, that is very, very hard to stop.  And that kind of scenario playing on an airliner flying directly into the United States is what I'm most concerned about.  And ISIS now has demonstrated they have that capable that we only thought al Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula had. So this is something that now we're vetting employees I think a lot more strictly.  And I had a bill that passed out of congress to do that as well.  But this is one of the biggest threats to the aviation sector.”

 

McCaul reacts to the shooting in Colorado Springs: “Well, this is a horrible tragedy.  It doesn't advance the pro life movement, killing any lives doesn't advance that.  I think this is a case of mental illness.  We have found that under current law if you're adjudicated mentally defective you can't purchase a firearm.  What we found is that too many of these cases haven't gotten into the system like the Navy Yard shooter.  And I think we need to look at there's legislation to put more of this - more of these cases into the system so that we can try to prevent something like this. But, you know, I mean it's a sad event that, you know, I can see why women would be concerned.  And I know that with clinics that the security is being heightened.”

 

FULL POST

November 29th, 2015
11:57 AM ET

Huckabee: "What he did is domestic terrorism, and what he is did is absolutely abominable"

SOTU

Today on CNN’s State of the Union, former Governor and Republican presidential candidate Mike Huckabee (R-AR), joined anchor, Brianna Keilar to discuss the Colorado Springs shooting and the threat of ISIS.

 

For more information, see http://cnnpressroom.blogs.cnn.com/. Also, text highlights and a transcript of the discussion are below.

 

MANDATORY CREDIT: CNN’s “State of the Union”

 

Contacts: Lauren Pratapas — Lauren.Pratapas@turner.com; 202.465.6666; Zachary Lilly – Zachary.Lilly@turner.com

 

TEXT HIGHLIGHTS

 

Huckabee responds to the attack on a Planned Parenthood in Colorado: “Well, we don't know fully what the facts are.  They're still being determined.  We don't even know some of the victims' names yet. But regardless of why he did it, what he did is domestic terrorism, and what he is did is absolutely abominable, especially to those of us in the pro-life movement, because there's nothing about any of us that would condone or in any way look the other way at something like this. We're not going have the kind of language that you heard from John Kerry, where he's talked about legitimizing or rationalizing terrorist actions.  There is no legitimizing.  There is no rationalizing.  It was mass murder.  It was absolutely unfathomable.”

 

Huckabee explains his views on criminalizing abortion: “Well, there wouldn't be a criminal penalty against a woman. I have often said, Brianna, that there are two victims with every abortion.  One is the unborn child who loses its life, and the other is often that woman who is talked into the abortion, pressured into it, maybe feels she has no other option. There's no reason to criminalize her.  I personally think that that would be a useless and, frankly, a harsh and unnecessary kind of attack on a woman who needs love and support and assistance, not criminalization.”

 

Huckabee on ISIS: “Brianna, after the attack in Mali, there were numerous reports that the gunmen were going around and saying, can you quote a verse from the Koran?  If they said yes, they were allowed to go free.  If they couldn't, they were shot. And so the point was is that, while the president has said we need to disarm law-abiding people, it was just a reminder that we are at war with radical Islam, whether we want to admit that or not.  It's not that we are at war with all Islam, but we are at war with those who believe that the purpose they have on earth is to declare a worldwide caliphate to kill all the infidels and all the unbelievers, which would mean everyone, including other Muslims, who don't agree to their harsh, intense, anti-woman, anti-human being approach to life and who want to take us back to the seventh century.”

 

Huckabee on a coalition against ISIS: “If you mean coalition of the unwilling, those who refuse to lift a finger to stop this aggression, they should be isolated.  And, yes, we should put sanctions on them.

There's no excuse, especially for Middle Eastern nations, especially for Muslim Middle Eastern nations, to simply sit back and do nothing and let America, the United Kingdom, France, NATO countries, to let the rest of the world attack this malignant cancer called Islamic jihadism, and then sit back and protect their own special and well-funded kingdoms. There has to be a concerted effort.  This is a world battle.  And we're fighting not so much for land, real estate, and the color of our flag.  Brianna, we're - we're really fighting for whether or not we're going to be a civilized world or we're going to be savages, because what is represented by Islamic Jihadism is nothing less than savagery and uncivilized behavior. When you cut people's heads off because they don't agree with your faith, when you put them in a cage, you pour gas on them, and set them afire in a cage, that's not civilized behavior.  That's savagery. “

FULL POST

ALL-AMERICAN FAMILY Launches Fall Doc Short Series Across CNN’s Digital Platforms
November 25th, 2015
09:47 AM ET

ALL-AMERICAN FAMILY Launches Fall Doc Short Series Across CNN’s Digital Platforms

Award-winning filmmaker Andrew Jenks’s doc short explores family, high school football, and Deaf culture

In Pleasanton, Ca., brothers Zane and Jax Pedersen are famous for leading their high school football team to glory. Like many brothers, they are rivals and best friends – their family and school is also largely Deaf. Four generations of Pedersens have played football at the California School for the Deaf, teaching visitors that they are fierce competitors on the field – and fiercely proud of their Deaf culture. ALL-AMERICAN FAMILY, directed by award-winning filmmaker Andrew Jenks, and produced by Jenks and Daniel Zinn through Andrew Jenks Entertainment, and co-produced by CNN Films and CNN Digital Studios, is streaming across CNN’s digital platforms now, kicking off a new series of digital documentary short films.

ALL-AMERICAN FAMILY, which runs approximately 12 minutes, shows the exuberance and comradery of football in a suburban town, the love of a tight-knit family, proud of its young generation, and the community that comes with being Deaf. Jenks describes his passion quest in pursuing this film as having begun when he was a teenager and lived not far from a school for the Deaf.

“I would pass a school for the Deaf enroute to the local mall and thought if I could ever make movies, I would want to make one that captured that world. I thought a good entry point would be an aspect of life that most people can relate to, or find accessible. A high school football team came to mind; sort of like my own version of Friday Night Lights.” said Jenks. “I feel so lucky to have met the Pedersen family and to have had the opportunity to tell a little slice of their extraordinary family story.”

ALL-AMERICAN FAMILY premiered at New York’s Tribeca Film Festival and won the audience award for best short film at the 2015 Hamptons International Film Festival. The film is presented across CNN’s digital platforms exclusively by Volkswagen. The film will be available via CNN.com and across CNN’s mobile properties. For a preview of the film, please visit www.CNN.com/shortfilms.

In future weeks, following the premiere of ALL-AMERICAN FAMILY, CNN’s digital film series will include films by award-winning filmmakers Sharon Liese and Roger Ross Williams.

CNN’s inaugural series of short films launched in March and currently includes the films UBAH!, about the uncommon life of Somalian supermodel and philanthropist Ubah Hassan, directed by Joe Berlinger; RAISING RYLAND, a journey inside the transgender experience as lived by a six-year-old boy, directed by Sarah Feeley; and THE 414S: THE ORIGINAL TEENAGE HACKERS, about a small, talented group of Milwaukee teens who hacked into dozens of prominent computer systems – including the Los Alamos National Laboratory – during the early days of the Internet, directed by Michael T. Vollmann.

About CNN Films

CNN Films produces and acquires documentary feature and short films for theatrical and festival exhibition and distribution across CNN’s multiple platforms.  Amy Entelis, evp of talent and content development, and Courtney Sexton, senior director for program development, oversee the strategy for CNN Films. For more information about CNN Films, please visit www.CNN.com/CNNFilms, www.CNN.com/shortfilms, and follow @CNNFilms via Twitter.

About CNN

CNN Worldwide is a portfolio of two dozen news and information services across cable, satellite, radio, wireless devices and the Internet in more than 200 countries and territories worldwide. Domestically, CNN reaches more individuals on television, the web and mobile devices than any other cable TV news organization in the United States; internationally, CNN is the most widely distributed news channel reaching more than 271 million households abroad; and CNN Digital is a top network for online news, mobile news and social media. Additionally, CNN Newsource is the world’s most extensively utilized news service partnering with hundreds of local and international news organizations around the world. CNN is division of Turner Broadcasting System, Inc., a Time Warner Company.

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November 23rd, 2015
04:33 PM ET

Secretary of State John Kerry on COP21 in Paris

CNN’s FAREED ZAKARIA GPS featured an exclusive interview with Secretary of State John Kerry discussing the U.S. participation in the upcoming COP21 Climate Change Conference in Paris. This interview was taped in the Benjamin Franklin Room at the State Department on Thursday, Nov. 12.

MANDATORY CREDIT for reference and usage: “CNN’s FAREED ZAKARIA GPS”

HIGHLIGHT

Secretary Kerry on advance target setting prior to the upcoming multinational summit on climate change in Paris

Now that's why President Obama reached an agreement with President Xi - a ground-breaking, historic agreement - to join together to announce the intended emissions reductions that both countries would make as part of the Paris negotiations in hopes of inspiring other countries to do the same. Well, guess what? Now over 150 countries have announced their targets for emissions reductions, including India.  Now, they're not enough yet and - for - by anybody - we've all got to move more….

TRANSCRIPT

THIS IS A RUSH TRANSCRIPT. THIS COPY MAY NOT BE IN ITS FINAL FORM AND MAY BE UPDATED.

FAREED ZAKARIA, HOST: Let me ask you about climate change, Mr. Secretary. You are embarking on a big push for the Paris summit. You gave a speech this week. In that speech, you were very eloquent in criticizing critics in the United States who are still skeptical about climate change.

But what do you say to those who say, look, that's all well and good, but the real skeptics, in a sense, are countries like India and Indonesia and, to an extent, even China, despite some changes, that still continue to use massive amounts of coal, emit huge amounts of carbon dioxide; and that whatever the United States or Western - or Europe may do, that's the real problem; and in those countries, they want to develop, they're not going to stop themselves from developing; the Paris treaty is not legally binding; so we will just cripple ourselves without doing much for climate change?

JOHN KERRY, U.S. SECRETARY OF STATE: Well, Fareed, that's the challenge. And it doesn't make a lot of sense to develop and kill yourself as you do it. It - you know, we've learned lessons about the downsides of the way in which we have produced energy - electricity and power and transportation and so forth - over centuries now. And we have to move to a low-carbon economy, all of us.

If the United States, all by itself, tomorrow, were to drive, you know, carpool to work and bicycle to work and plant a bunch of trees and lower our emissions to zero, we can't solve the problem alone. India, China, every country in the world has to be part of it.

Now that's why President Obama reached an agreement with President Xi - a ground-breaking, historic agreement - to join together to announce the intended emissions reductions that both countries would make as part of the Paris negotiations in hopes of inspiring other countries to do the same.

Well, guess what? Now over 150 countries have announced their targets for emissions reductions, including India.

Now, they're not enough yet and - for - by anybody - we've all got to move more. But if we come together in Paris - and I believe we can and hopefully will - to have an ambitious set of targets that we will all try to reach - not, you know - that we all agree to voluntarily try to reach - that will be an incredible signal to the marketplace, which already is seeing investment move into clean, alternative renewable different kinds of energy production. The solution to climate change is energy policy.

So it's a question of what choices we need to make in order to preserve our ability on this planet to produce food, to have water, to live where people live today without massive dislocations of human beings, without massive damage from intensified storms and wildfires and droughts, and all of the downsides that we're already beginning to measure.

So this is actually opportunity, not downside. And I think Paris will help define the full breadth of that opportunity. There’s going to be trillions of dollars that will be invested in these new lower-carbon energy sources, and I think it's going - it can - has the chance of transforming everybody's economy for the better.

ZAKARIA: But Mr. Secretary, these countries are announcing these limits - none of it is legally binding, because the treaty is not legally binding.

KERRY: Well, first of all, it's not a treaty, but it - there could be parts of it that are going to be legally binding. The targets themselves may not be. That, you know, is yet to be determined.

I recently made a comment about this, and people said, well the whole thing is not going to be legally binding. That's not accurate. There could be parts of it - the transparency, the accountability, the further down the road - I mean, there are different things.

All of that has yet to be decided. That will be decided in Paris.

ZAKARIA: Mr. Secretary, pleasure to have you on, sir.

KERRY: Thank you.

### END ###

November 22nd, 2015
11:47 AM ET

Nunes: What the Obama administrations says about ISIS "just doesn't jive with what we see on the ground"

SOTU

Today on CNN’s State of the Union, Representative and chairman of the permanent select committee on intelligence (R-CA), joined anchor, Jake Tapper to discuss the Obama administration’s strategy against ISIS.

For more information, see http://cnnpressroom.blogs.cnn.com/. Also, text highlights and a transcript of the discussion are below.

MANDATORY CREDIT: CNN’s “State of the Union”

Contacts: Lauren Pratapas — Lauren.Pratapas@turner.com; 202.465.6666; Zachary Lilly – Zachary.Lilly@turner.com

 

TEXT HIGHLIGHTS

 

Nunes reacts to possible ISIS threats inside the United States: “No credible threat that we know about, Jake.  That's the real issue here is that because so many of the terrorists have gotten good at their operational security, we just don't know what we don't know.   And there's nothing specific except for the threats that they've been putting out there on the internet.  So, at this point we have to take everything seriously… We did had many of these people identified, but there are so many thousands and thousands of them and they're all over western Europe and even in the United States and then with the technology that they're using today and the rules and lessons they've learned through fighting us over the last 15 years they've gotten very good at hiding from intelligence services across globe.”

Nunes on the investigation into intelligence reports: “ Well, we are involved in this investigation.  We're working closely with the House armed services committee and the defense appropriations committee and we're trying to gather all the facts. So, we have heard from a lot of whistleblowers and other informants who have given us information, and not just related strictly to the latest allegations, Jake.  These go back for four years. And I'll tell you it's really from the members on the intelligence committee.  We travel to many of these countries and we meet with the people on the ground.  And it's almost all the time what we hear and see on the ground, when we talk to the folks that are actually doing the work and then what we see in finished intelligence product - and I think more alarming, what we hear the president and his senior officials saying to the public, it just doesn't jive with what they're saying in public and what we see on the ground.”

Nunes on recently passed House legislation regarding refugees: “What the House passed is definitely needed, because from the information that I see and if I was in the shoes of ISIS or al Qaeda, I would definitely try to get people into these types of refugee programs.  So, the House legislation is needed. I agree that there needs to be a longer look at what needs to happen in the long run with the visa waiver program and who is allowed to get into the United States, but that's going take more time. But in the short-term we can put in so that the FBI and other intelligence agencies would have to clear who gets into this country.  I think it's a very small ask and why the president is opposing it seems a little deaf to me.”

  FULL POST


Topics: ISIS • Jake Tapper • State of the Union
November 22nd, 2015
11:44 AM ET

Hagel: "I think it's pretty clear that ISIS" not Assad "represents the real threat to our country, to the world"

SOTU

Today on CNN’s State of the Union, former secretary of defense Chuck Hagel, joined anchor, Jake Tapper to discuss the Obama administration’s strategy against ISIS.

For more information, see http://cnnpressroom.blogs.cnn.com/. Also, text highlights and a transcript of the discussion are below.

MANDATORY CREDIT: CNN’s “State of the Union”

Contacts: Lauren Pratapas — Lauren.Pratapas@turner.com; 202.465.6666; Zachary Lilly – Zachary.Lilly@turner.com

 

TEXT HIGHLIGHTS

 

Hagel on U.S. strategy against ISIS: “You're constantly adapting it and shifting it.  But my point has been that we need to more clearly define the political strategy along that should the lead the military strategy.  Putting boots on the ground or special operations forces or the strikes - we started those strikes more than a year ago, and they are part of the strategy.  They have to be part of the strategy. Building up the military capacity with those who are willing to help in that area, part of the strategy, but it has to - that has to be just part of the strategy.  And that must come from a larger overview of, what is the larger objective here?”

 

Hagel on the threats posed by ISIS and Assad: “We're up against an ideology.  We're up against a reality of dynamics, a set of dynamics we have never seen before, sophistication of social media, the military prowess, the tactical, strategic prowess that ISIS possesses, the funding.  So, we should more clearly define, what is our political strategy?  What are our priorities?  Who is the enemy here?  Is Assad the enemy or is ISIS the enemy… But I think it's pretty clear that ISIS represents the real threat to our country, to the world.”

 

Hagel on the accuracy of intelligence reports: “I think there's always, though - and isn't new - a conflict between our military on the ground vs. different intelligence groups.  And, by the way, we have to remember there's more than just one intelligence group out there.  We have got 16 independent intelligence agencies.  And most of them reside in the Pentagon and the DOD… Now, that doesn't mean something couldn't happen below the secretary of defense's office.  You can't monitor everything.  There is conflict always.  I know that.  I asked a lot of questions.  I know Chairman Dempsey always asked a lot of questions. But this particular issue, I'm not aware of it, nor did that come up to me when I was secretary of defense.”

  FULL POST


Topics: ISIS • Jake Tapper • State of the Union
November 22nd, 2015
11:42 AM ET

Christie: Mayor de Blasio "should be mayor of Damascus"

SOTU

Today on CNN’s State of the Union, Governor and presidential candidate Chris Christie (R-NJ), joined anchor, Jake Tapper to discuss the threat of ISIS and the 2016 presidential election.

For more information, see http://cnnpressroom.blogs.cnn.com/. Also, text highlights and a transcript of the discussion are below.

MANDATORY CREDIT: CNN’s “State of the Union”

Contacts: Lauren Pratapas — Lauren.Pratapas@turner.com; 202.465.6666; Zachary Lilly – Zachary.Lilly@turner.com

TEXT HIGHLIGHTS

 

Christie on the changes made to U.S. information gathering techniques: “And I know that what we did this summer was wrong.  I said it was wrong at the time, and it's now being proven to have been wrong, when we cut back on the NSA's metadata collection program and have been destroying the morale of our intelligence officers. We need to rebuild that program.  We need to rebuild the morale of our intelligence.  We need to support law enforcement, which this administration hasn't been doing.  And the FBI director himself said there's a chill wind through law enforcement. We need to do all those things first and foremost, Jake, to protect the homeland, because the number one job of the president of the United States is to protect the safety and security of the American people.  National security is not an option.  It's a fundamental right.  And that's what we will be focused on. “

Christie reacts to settlement of Syrian refugees inside New Jersey: “We should have been informed about it.  And we were not. And this is part of the problem with this administration.  They're an imperial administration that just decides they're going to place people in individual states and not even inform the state of government of the fact that they have done it.  That information is just recently released. And they're placing them through nongovernmental organizations and not giving any information to the state governments until just recently, when we demanded them and there was public pressure on them to do that.  And so the fact is that we should have these folks vetted and vetted well.  The FBI director says they cannot be vetted. Jake, this is not me saying it.  This is the president's own FBI director saying it.  And so the president needs to get his own story straight in Washington, D.C.  Then he can get folks, political appointees like John Kerry and Jeh Johnson, to write whatever letters they want to the governors.  The FBI director testified before Congress.”

Christie responds to Kasich’s proposed agency to promote Judeo-Christian values: “I don't think that's something we need to do. What I want to see is a nation that continues to say, we want you to practice your religion and practice it vigorously.  And as long as you practice it peacefully, and you're not trying to impose your religious values on anyone else, then you should be able to practice it the way you want. I don't think we need another government agency, quite frankly.  I don't think we need to add more layers of bureaucracy to this government and add more expense.  And so, no, that's not something I would favor.”

Christie on rules of engagement and civilian casualties: “ISIS doesn't seem to be concerned about civilian casualties, Jake. And we need to get real about this.  And we need to bring our allies together and revise rules of engagement to make sure that what we're doing is taking on ISIS in a significant, direct way that will be effective. And, obviously, this president was wrong when he said on Thursday of last week that ISIS was contained.  And then the next day, the attacks started in Paris.  So, this - this administration has no credibility in giving us any type of assessment of how this is going.  We have the attacks in Mali now.  He said al Qaeda was on the run.  Obviously, that's wrong as well.”

  FULL POST

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