May 31st, 2015
05:06 PM ET

Glenn Greenwald on Reliable Sources: "The whole world has changed when it comes to this debate [on the Patriot Act] as a result of the revelations from Edward Snowden"

Today on CNN’s Reliable Sources, Glenn Greenwald, co-founding Editor of The Intercept, joined senior media correspondent Brian Stelter to discuss Edward Snowden’s feelings on the Patriot Act debate and the role journalists play in providing anonymity to certain sources.

Reliable Sources airs Sundays, 11 a.m. to noon (ET).

Text highlights and a transcript from the show are available below.  Credit all usage to CNN’s “Reliable Sources” FULL POST


Topics: Brian Stelter • CNN • Reliable Sources
May 31st, 2015
04:59 PM ET

Bryan Burrough of Vanity Fair on Reliable Sources: "...time is actually on NBC's side... I would guess they're going to take this to the last possible minute"

Today on CNN’s Reliable Sources, Vanity Fair correspondent Bryan Burrough, Variety.com, co-Editor-in-Chief Andrew Wallenstein, and Baltimore Sun television and media critic David Zurawik joined senior media correspondent Brian Stelter to discuss their reporting on whether NBC is likely to return Brian Williams to Nightly News, if news executives are likely to move him to another role at NBC, or if he is likely to separate from the network.

Reliable Sources airs Sundays, 11 a.m. to noon (ET).

Text highlights and a transcript from the show are available below.  Credit all usage to CNN’s “Reliable Sources”

FULL POST


Topics: Brian Stelter • CNN • Reliable Sources
May 31st, 2015
04:55 PM ET

EXCLUSIVE: Gen McChrystal on SOTU: "It's an American soldier and so getting him back, to me, is a pretty sacred responsibility"

Today on CNN’s State of the Union, Gen Stanley McChrystal (USA, ret), joined chief national security correspondent Jim Sciutto to discuss his perspectives on ‎the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq, the trade of PFC Bowe Bergdahl for the 'Taliban 5' , and a security risk assessment ‎if their confinement terms for the “Taliban 5” change. Gen. McChrystal also discussed whether he would ever consider running for U.S. president.

Text and video highlights and a transcript of the discussion are below

MANDATORY CREDIT: CNN’s “State of the Union”

TEXT HIGHLIGHTS

On if the confinement terms for the Taliban 5‎ change, will they “go back to the battlefield”: “The five that are back - presumably, they will go back to the battlefield but they won't change the dynamics. It's not going to change the balance of effort there, five guys, but it's just something we are - watch as we go forward. … I say presume, because you have to assume to worst case in a case like this. We can't have assumed to have changed their thinking in a time they were in our captivity, I mean, anymore than we would want an American who had been held by the enemy to change his thinking.”

On having extended military operations in Afghanistan: “I think it is just a recognition that we can get a balance. Most of the fighting on the ground is being done by Afghan police and military and they are bearing most the casualties. I think America brings some very specific capabilities to do precision operations with Afghan partners in many cases. But I think it goes back to confidence as well. Afghans will do well if they believe they have got the kind of strategic partnership that President Obama offered them in 2009 when he explicitly said, we will be your strategic partner. You can't put a number on that. It's not a specific number of Americans planes or boots on the ground. It's the sense that we are an absolutely committed friend that will help them protect their sovereignty.”

On running for president of the United States: “No, Jim. I really want young people - qualified young people. I'd like to see more young veterans going in but I have zero intent. …I am not going to run for any office, period. ”

VIDEO HIGHLIGHTS

How long will the U.S. mission in Afghanistan last?

FULL TRANSCRIPT

THIS IS A RUSH FDCH TRANSCRIPT. THIS COPY MAY NOT BE IN ITS FINAL FORM AND MAY BE UPDATED.

JIM SCIUTTO, CNN HOST: Welcome back. I am Jim Sciutto in Washington. General Stanley McChrystal is four star general and commander of American forces - coalition forces in Afghanistan. He was - he's credited with transforming the U.S. forces into the elite fighting force they are today. He is author of a new book "Team of Teams: New Rules of Engagement for a Complex World." And it is certainly a very complex world.
General McChrystal, thanks very much for joining us. Had the pleasure of seeing you when you were commander in Afghanistan. You've been travelling around the country a little bit so it's nice to see you out of the uniform.

GEN. STANLEY MCCHRYSTAL, U.S. ARMY (RET.): It's great to be here. Thanks.

SCIUTTO: I want to begin with the case of Bowe Bergdahl, Taliban Five because today that deal is expiring and we are still waiting here what the next step will be. But first I want to ask you about Sergeant Bergdahl.

You were commander when he was taken. Were you a deserter?

MCCHRYSTAL: Well, I've been in command for about a month and when he left his base we didn't know. We had reason to believe he walked off his base but he could have been a confused young man, and that may still be the ruling, I am not sure. So, we made every effort we could like we would for your son or daughter to try to recover him as fast as we could.

SCIUTTO: Now, if it was discovered at the time, and I know that the questions - the details were certainly murky then and to some degree there are still questions today, but if he was a deserter, would that change at all U.S. efforts to rescue him?

MCCHRYSTAL: It's hard to make that kind of judgment because it would have been impossible to know at the moment if he was a deserter. We were trying to prevent him from being taken into Pakistan where we thought he would fall into the hands of Haqqani for two reasons. One, because he's an American citizen and one of ours, a comrade. And second, because he would then become a chip in the power gain there, and we were concerned about both of those.

SCIUTTO: Do you have any concerns about the deal that was made a year ago to trade these five senior Taliban leaders for his freedom?

MCCHRYSTAL: Well, I think if you look going forward getting back an American soldier was important particularly until he is adjudicated it impossible to say what was the cause. So, it was important to get him back. I think now we've got to move forward. We got to decide what we deal with. The five that are back - presumably, they will go back to the battlefield but they won't change the dynamics. It's not going to change the balance of effort there, five guys, but it's just something we are - watch as we go forward.

SCIUTTO: But that's an enormous concern. You say presumably they will go back to the fight, first of all that's an alarming assumption. And yes, there are a number of members of Taliban who won't change but they are quite senior in the organization. Would that not be a loss? Would that not put U.S. forces in danger there?

MCCHRYSTAL: I wouldn't make it too important. They were in captivity quite awhile. They're not going to go back, I think, to a key operational role. I say presume, because you have to assume to worst case in a case like this. We can't have assumed to have changed their thinking in a time they were in our captivity, I mean, anymore than we would want an American who had been held by the enemy to change his thinking. So, I think we have to presume that their bonds with their old organization are probably going to be pretty strong and just go from there.

SCIUTTO: And if they do go back, that deal you still think was a good deal to gain his freedom?

MCCHRYSTAL: It's hard to make a judgment on a deal like that. It's an American soldier and so getting him back to me is a pretty sacred responsibility.

SCIUTTO: I want to ask you about Iraq. The fight against ISIS is not going well. The map really immutable for the last several months despite a massive U.S.-led air campaign and a massive advantage among the Iraqi and Kurdish forces aligned against the forces of ISIS. You have been very public in saying you need U.S. forces - boots on the ground to fight this fight and win. Is that what is necessary to turn this around?

MCCHRYSTAL: Well, what I have actually said is we first need a very clear strategy to deal with ISIS and to establish a framework for the region. Because if we don't have a direction of where we are going, where the instate will be, the just defeating ISIS will just be a sort of a meaningless act.

Second, we have got to recognize what ISIS is, and it's a phenomenon of the 21st century. It's based on some age-old ideas but as you and I both know is they are operating in a way that is disorienting to organizations of the region. They've got this incredible tactical ability to combine suicide bombers with pretty flexible tactics on the ground and this superb information warfare campaign. It's very decentralized. It makes us all worry about what they are doing.

I think we are going to have to show leadership in the region. I think American presence and leadership is going to be critical to build a team of teams against ISIS.

SCIUTTO: To demonstrate leadership do you have to commit American forces on the ground?

MCCHRYSTAL: I think you have got to demonstrate American revolve and leadership. In some cases it could be Americans on the ground with Iraqi forces helping leverage as you know one (INAUDIBLE) army in a difficult time like the Iraqi army is needs that feel of the cloth of comrades. And I think Americans can be a big part of that, but I don't think thousands and thousands of American forces on the ground to be ground forces (INAUDIBLE) would do that is probably the right move right now.

SCIUTTO: So, you mean - and this is something that General Dempsey and others have raised, the idea of forward deployed advisers. So, in other words military advisers instead of back in the base, they are on the forward lines or forward ground controllers. Is that what you're talking about?

MCCHRYSTAL: Yes, it is. Because war is about confidence.

If you know when the Iraqis pulled out of Ramadi, it was a military calculus, but in reality it was much more a loss of confidence. Sometimes just the presence of American advisers with their connection to air power and whatnot can bolster the confidence of leaders and provide additional advice as well.

SCIUTTO: And confidence seems to be key because you here this - the words of Secretary Ash Carter saying, they didn't have the will to fight.

MCCHRYSTAL: Confidence is everything at every level. It starts having confidence in your leaders all the way up to your national leaders and then in yourselves. And I think that's something we could potentially help with.

SCIUTTO: I want to ask you about Afghanistan because this was meant to be the year of the end of the U.S. Military presence in Afghanistan.

The president has extended the smaller force that is there for a bit of a longer period of time. But the reporting on the ground is that those forces are doing more kinetic activity than the president had described. Initially he said, well, they will protect U.S. forces for its protection et cetera but there is evidence that they are doing offensive operations, going after Taliban leaders. Is this a stealth extension of the U.S. war in Afghanistan?

MCCHRYSTAL: I think it is just a recognition that we can get a balance.

Most of the fighting on the ground is being done by Afghan police and military and they are bearing most the casualties. I think America brings some very specific capabilities to do precision operations with Afghan partners in many cases. But I think it goes back to confidence as well.

Afghans will do well if they believe they have got the kind of strategic partnership that President Obama offered them in 2009 when he explicitly said, we will be your strategic partner. You can't put a number on that. It's not a specific number of Americans planes or boots on the ground. It's the sense that we are an absolutely committed friend that will help them protect their sovereignty.

SCIUTTO: But that sounds like a long commitment. And I'm harkening back a number of years.

I remember you said to me when we were in Kabul, and this is a good five years ago, you made the comparison to U.S. troops in Germany and Korea, they of course been there for decades. That that kind of commitment is not unusual when you are facing an enemy, in this case like the Taliban. Are you saying that you need an American force presence in Afghanistan for years and years to come to give that confidence?

MCCHRYSTAL: Well, I think you make that calculus. I think both Japan and Germany turned out pretty well and they could have turned out very differently. And so, I think, that if you look in the long sweep, wars don't have a set beginning and set end. As you know, all the things you do that lead up to a war and of course more importantly after a war prevents the next one.

So I think, if we look at our policy as a long continuum, and not being in a hurry and say, we may have people there for a long time. But in reality it's cheaper than doing spasmodic moves of big forces into (INAUDIBLE).

SCIUTTO: Finally, as you write this book about leadership, you have got a very strong reputation, of course, from your commands in Afghanistan. There are some who talk about you as a future political candidate. Do you plan or have any ideas or thoughts or ambitions to run for office?

MCCHRYSTAL: No, Jim. I really want young people - qualified young people. I'd like to see more young veterans going in but I have zero intent.

SCIUTTO: A lot of politicians who've said that and then changed their minds.

MCCHRYSTAL: No, let me be - let me be. I am not going to run for any office, period.

SCIUTTO: OK. General McChrystal, thanks very much for joining us today.

MCCHRYSTAL: Jim, thanks so much.

END INTERVIEW


Topics: CNN • Jim Sciutto • State of the Union
May 31st, 2015
02:54 PM ET

Gov Pataki on SOTU: "I think he [Rand Paul] is wrong... I don't understand why if it's going to happen on Wednesday or Thursday he doesn't allow it to happen today..."

Today on CNN’s State of the Union, 2016 presidential candidate, former Gov. George Pataki (R-NY), joined chief national security correspondent Jim Sciutto to discuss the Congressional reauthorization of the USA Freedom Act, Sen. Rand Paul’s filibuster of the reauthorization of key provisions, sending US troops to fight against ISIS, Pataki’s candidacy for the 2016 presidential race and presidential debate rules.

Text highlights and a transcript of the discussion are below

TEXT HIGHLIGHTS

Former Gov. Pataki on the late negotiations of the USA Freedom Act – and Sen. Rand Paul’s filibuster: “… it's just to me totally wrong that a filibuster would be used to create this void in our security at a time when we are at risk. And I honestly think, Jim, we are at as great a risk today as we have been at any time since September 11th of another terrorist attack. So, I hope they can get it done today.  By the way, I think they should reauthorize the Patriot Act. I think Senator King's comments about how the alternative - the House pass doesn't require the private sector to hold those phone records and without them we are at greater risk than we are today.”

Former Gov. Pataki on debate rules being the debate rules:  “Now Jim, the rules are what the rules are. Whether it's fair or not, you abide by the rules. And I'm not going to let it bother me one way or the other. It's August of 2015, whether I'm in the debate, not in the debate, I'm going to continue to make the case to the American people that my whole life has prepared me for this moment. I know I can lead this country. I know I have the vision. I know I have the background and experience. And if I'm in the debate, great. If I'm not in the debate, great. It's not where you start. It's where you finish.”

Former Gov. Pataki responds to former Gov. Martin O’Malley’s comment about the presidency not being “passed back and forth by you between two royal families”: “Well, sure. Obviously you don't pass it on to a family. You have to go earn it. And I'm a fan of Jeb Bush. I know if he decides to run he's not going to run because it a legacy thing but because he has a record of his own and he's fighting to get there. … I know I'm starting close if not at the bottom now but you fight the fight. You have a vision that Americans can believe in. You work harder than others. You talk about a record which I'm very proud of. And at the end that's what it matters where you are at the end.”

FULL POST


Topics: CNN • Jim Sciutto • State of the Union
May 31st, 2015
01:49 PM ET

Governor Jack Markell on Beau Biden: "...he was also just an incredibly good, real, genuine guy... And it's just an unbelievable loss"

Today on CNN’s State of the Union, Governor Jack Markell (D-DE), joined chief national security correspondent Jim Sciutto to briefly discuss the loss of Vice President Joe Biden’s son, Delaware’s Attorney General, Beau Biden.

A transcript of the discussion is below

MANDATORY CREDIT: CNN’s “State of the Union”

FULL TRANSCRIPT

THIS IS A RUSH FDCH TRANSCRIPT. THIS COPY MAY NOT BE IN ITS FINAL FORM AND MAY BE UPDATED.

JIM SCIUTTO, CNN HOST: Joining us now as well is Governor Jack Markell of Delaware. He worked with Beau Biden when he took office in 2009. Biden, of course, was attorney general.

Governor Markell, thank you for joining us.

We know you are close to the Biden family. Have you been in touch with them? How are they doing?

GOV. JACK MARKELL (D-DE): Well, I have not spoken to them.

I would say everybody in Delaware is close to the Biden family. Their impact here has just been tremendous. And Beau was an extraordinary human being. I mean, he was a great attorney general. He took his job very seriously. But he was also just an incredibly good, real, genuine guy. And he was the most popular politician in the state.

And he earned that. And he worked for it. And it's just an unbelievable loss.

SCIUTTO: He was a veteran himself as well of Iraq.

This is a loss, clearly, primarily for the Biden family. It's also a loss for the Democratic Party, is it not, in the state of Delaware?

MARKELL: Well, it is.

And it - this goes so well beyond politics. I mean, I have heard from plenty of Republicans in the last 12 hours who are feeling the loss deeply. You know, it's just - just deeper than any - than partisanship. He was well-respected in every part of the state.

And I spent a lot of time with him on some of the campaigns and then working with him. And this is a guy who was just really well- respected. He was a kind person. He was good-hearted. He was hardworking. He was the whole package.

SCIUTTO: This was a long battle, first dealing with it in 2013. Then he had a recovery and then a recurrence this year.

Did you have any sense of just how grave the situation was in recent days and weeks before his loss last night?

MARKELL: Not really.

You know, I spoke to Beau the last time in February, and I had invited him down to Washington to meet some of the other governors, because we all expected that Beau was going to run for governor next year. And had he wanted to run, he would have won and he would have served very capably.

And so we spoke back in February. It did not work on his schedule. And so I just, frankly, had no idea it was - that he - that this would happen.

SCIUTTO: Well, Governor Markell, we appreciate you joining us today. Our thoughts certainly with the family, with the Biden family, but also with the people of Delaware and all the people who knew him. So, thank you for taking the time.

MARKELL: Thank you very much. Bye-bye.

END INTERVIEW


Topics: CNN • Jim Sciutto • State of the Union
May 31st, 2015
01:22 PM ET

Sir Peter Westmacott rebuts accusation of Britain's resignation as a world power: "talk of strategic shrinkage or Britain withdrawing from the world is seriously overstated...the British government has had to make savings..."

Please credit any usage to “CNN’s FAREED ZAKARIA GPS”

The following transcript is of an exclusive interview with Britain’s Ambassador to the U.S., Sir Peter Westmacott.  Sir Westmacott discusses Britain’s intentions regarding joining the European Union, military interventions in Iraq and Syria, and responds on behalf of his government to Fareed Zakaria’s op-ed that Britain “has resigned” as a world power.

MANDATORY CREDIT for reference and usage: “CNN’s Fareed Zakaria GPS”

VIDEO HIGHLIGHTS

Fareed’s Take on Britain resigning as a global power

Peter Westmacott on the U.K.’s global relevance

TEXT HIGHLIGHTS

Zakaria to Westmacott on the British Parliament’s vote not to support the US military intervention in Syria

ZAKARIA: …If you look at the vote on Syria, the United States threatened force… the use of force against Syria, drew this famous red line, and one of the reasons, perhaps the principal reason Barack Obama changed his mind, in an extremely embarrassing way, was that the British parliament refused to support any U.S. military action… Isn't that a sign that Britain is unwilling to act like a global power?

WESTMACOTT: If you look at what we're doing now, I think the evidence says the opposite. Yes, that vote took place during the holiday season, in August, at short notice. But if you look at what we are doing now in the U.S.-led coalition against ISIL, it is really very significant what we're doing in Iraq. We’re also active in Syria. We're not taking part at the moment in air strikes in Syria. That is, indeed, the case. But we are very engaged in the campaign to get rid of Bashar al-Assad...”

Westmacott on whether Britain will become part of the EU

The Prime Minister's intention…is to ensure that we can get improvements in the way the European Union works. There are a number of changes that we need to negotiate.  But the strategy of the Prime Minister is to go to his colleagues, is to seek those improvements, and to then go back to the British people in a referendum with a strong enough package of improvements that the British people will conclude that their future lies in the European Union.

Westmacott on Europe and the U.S. still having a “special relationship”

WESTMACOTT: …when David Cameron was here a couple of months ago, I remember the President of the United States - I was there in the White House - describing him as a great friend and one of my closest and most trusted partners in the world. And that sounds to me like a pretty special relationship. When I was with the British defense secretary and Ash Carter a few weeks after that, I heard Ash Carter say that the special relationship with the United Kingdom was the cornerstone of the national security of both our countries…. I think if you look at the detail of what we are doing, the military cooperation, the interoperability, the way in which our intelligence services work closely together to counter terrorism and organized criminals and so on, I would not agree with your premise that there is a special relationship which has died or doesn't exist anymore.

FULL POST


Topics: CNN • Fareed Zakaria • Fareed Zakaria GPS
May 31st, 2015
01:08 PM ET

Lt. Gen. Mark Hertling and Michael O'Hanlon on ISIS' military strategy and the Shia militias

Please credit any usage to “CNN’s FAREED ZAKARIA GPS”

The following transcript is of an interview with Lt. General Mark Hertling, former Commanding general of US Army, Europe and Michael O’Hanlon, senior fellow of Brookings Institution. They discuss ISIS and their military-like operations, the probability of an ISIS victory and if America should support the Iranian-backed Shia militias.

MANDATORY CREDIT for reference and usage: “CNN’s Fareed Zakaria GPS”

TEXT HIGHLIGHTS

Hertling on if America should support the Shia militias in their fight against ISIS: “They are going to be players on the scene, Fareed. And they're certainly neighbors of Iraq. So they are want to - they are going to want to contribute to this fight. We have got to work around their actions in one way or another without supporting them… Yes, we're going to have to work somehow with them, but not work with them, if you can understand what I'm saying.”

O’Hanlon on what America and Iraqi special forces can do to avoid an ISIS victory: “I think one big issue here is should American Special Forces be involved, not only in advising, but even in participating in some of the raids that would be used to take back a city, because there are a lot of predictable locations. And if we can work with Iraqi special forces to hit hard and fairly simultaneously ourselves at a number of these locations, I think there are some real vulnerabilities that ISIL has trying to act as a government.”

FULL POST


Topics: CNN
May 31st, 2015
12:59 PM ET

Sen Mike Lee on SOTU: "I think the question is not really about whether we will get this passed, but when.‎"

Today on CNN’s State of the Union, Senator Mike Lee (R-UT) and Senator Angus King (I-ME), joined chief national security correspondent Jim Sciutto to discuss this past weekend's Senate negotiations to renew the USA Freedom Act and the possible consequences to the current powers in the act if it is allowed to lapse during the Chamber's recess.

Text and video highlights and a transcript of the discussion are below

MANDATORY CREDIT: CNN’s “State of the Union”

TEXT HIGHLIGHTS

Sen. Mike Lee on having the votes to pass the USA Freedom Act:  “I do believe we have the votes… I think the question is not really about whether we will get this passed, but when. It will happen either tonight or it will happen on Wednesday or some time in between then, but really within that 72-hour window, we are going to pass the House- passed USA Freedom Act, which passed the House with a bipartisan supermajority of 338 votes.”

Sen. Angus King on his concerns with the USA Freedom Act: “I think it's important that people understand, we are not talking about the content of phone calls. My concern - and I support the concept of moving the data out of the government. I think that's a good idea from a privacy point of view. My concern is that, if you move it out of the government, leave it with the phone companies, and the phone companies say, well, we're deciding we're only going to hold that data for a week or a month or six months, then the program loses its functionality altogether, and you have in effect repealed it without really saying so.”

Sen. Mike Lee on how the bad habits of both parties slowed the process of passing this bill: “…we proposed this bill last year, so that it could be introduced and passed well in advance of this deadline. Unfortunately, this sort of thing has become all too common. It's been a trend and a bad habit adopted by both parties. Bad habits, old habits sometimes die hard. But this is an idea and a habit whose idea has - whose time has finally come. I think it's time for us to move forward and to stop governing by cliff.”

Sen. Angus King on creating a balance between the Fourth Amendment and providing “common defense”: “…what we are doing here, Jim, is trying to balance the fundamental responsibility that the Constitution assigns to us of national security, to provide for the common defense and ensure domestic tranquility…with the Fourth Amendment and privacy rights. But the Fourth Amendment isn't absolute. It said people shall be free of unreasonable searches and seizures. We are always trying to strike the balance between those two principles, in light of risks and in light of technology.”

Sen. Mike Lee on collecting phone record data, even under this new bill proposal: “…the phone companies will hold the records, because they are the phone companies. They have a record of who calls whom. …the NSA will be able to query and reach out to the phone companies to get that calling data that is relevant to an actual national security investigation. But we don't think it's a good idea for the government to just be collecting all this data in bulk just because it's there. This data, when aggregated and when put into a database that covers a five-year period of time, potentially 300 million Americans, it reveals a lot about a person, about how they spend their time. And we don't think it's appropriate for the government to just collect this information simply because it exists.”

Sen. Angus King on if the potential 72-hour window once the bill is passed, concerns him: “It does concern me.  …it now does look like the votes are there. So, the only question is when. And I would hope that those who are making a big deal of standing in the way and objecting and blocking realize that all they are really doing is slowing something down for two or three days, that there is a risk created. …we could get it over with tonight if people will cede back time, if you will, pass the bill, and it could be on the president's desk tomorrow morning, with no lapse in the protections for the public. …And I don't want to exaggerate the risk, but it created a risk that we won't have a tool in our national security toolkit.”

VIDEO HIGHLIGHTS

GOP Senator: NSA reform bill will pass

Senator: U.S. threat level has never been higher

FULL POST


Topics: CNN • Jim Sciutto • State of the Union
May 24th, 2015
04:30 PM ET

Sen Bernie Sanders (I-VT) to Brian Stelter on CNN's Reliable Sources: "... you have ABC, CBS, and NBC not devoting one minute to the most significant trade agreement in the history of the USA"

Today on CNN’s Reliable Sources, Democratic presidential candidate and Senator Bernie Sanders (I-VT), joined anchor Brian Stelter to discuss his concerns with the media’s campaign coverage and how breaking news stories should look. Reliable Sources airs Sundays, 11 a.m. to noon (ET). A transcript and text highlights from the show are available below.  Credit all usage to CNN’s “Reliable Sources”

FULL POST


Topics: Brian Stelter • CNN • Reliable Sources
May 24th, 2015
04:15 PM ET

Bob Schieffer to Brian Stelter on CNN's Reliable Sources: "...getting accurate information, Brian, is harder now than it's ever been... "

Today on CNN’s Reliable Sources, CBS anchor, Bob Schieffer, joined anchor Brian Stelter to discuss ending his legendary 45+ year journalistic career and how he’s made a practice of not discussing his competitors including George Stephanopolus and Brian Williams. Reliable Sources airs Sundays, 11 a.m. to noon (ET). A transcript and video from the show are available below.  Credit all usage to CNN’s “Reliable Sources”

FULL POST


Topics: Brian Stelter • CNN • Reliable Sources
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