CNN

December 12th, 2014

Preview: CNN International Programme Information Weeks 1 & 2

CNN Ones to Watch

David Adjaye (pictured) is this month’s ‘CNN Ones to Watch’ master.

Friday 9 January at 1030 GMT/ 1130 CET and 1630 GMT/1730 CET

Saturday 10 January at 1430 GMT/ 1530 CET and 2030 GMT/ 2130 CET

Sunday 11 January at 0430 GMT/0530 CET

Monday 12 January at 0930 GMT/ 1030 CET

Tuesday 13 January at 1030 GMT/ 1130 CET and 1730 GMT/1830 CET

Wednesday 14 January at 0430 GMT/ 0530 CET

Duration: 30 minutes

‘CNN Ones to Watch’ shines a light on up-and-coming creative talent set to be the next big names in culture and the arts. In January, the show looks at the next up-coming names in architecture.

From the temples of ancient Greece to the jagged skylines of Dubai, every structure on our planet was conceived by a creative mind – an architect. Today’s architects are battling to balance our desire for aesthetic with our need to live sustainably. Growing populations and fragile environments are changing the way people design. This month ‘CNN Ones to Watch’ ‘master’ is international architect David Adjaye, the man behind the new Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture in the US.

The show also hears from Daniel Libeskind, the world-renowned, New York-based architect who was chosen as master planner of the World Trade Center redevelopment after 9/11. Libeskind takes viewers on a tour of his latest building, the Centre De Congres in the Belgian city of Mons.

Adjaye’s first choice is Kunle Adeyemi, a remarkable Nigerian architect, who uses architectural ingenuity to tackle problems of building in his country’s waterfront cities. His second choice is Vietnamese architect Vo Trong Nghia, shortlisted for Building of the Year 2014 at the World Architecture Festival. Nghia is adamant about using raw materials from his home country like Bamboo to build homes for the people who live there.

Adjaye and Libeskind  both share their views on architecture today on ‘CNN Ones to Watch’. They believe the focus of architecture in the future will be less towards large iconic ‘cathedrals’ and more on the needs of environment, sustainability and security required by people.

@DanielLibeskind

cnn.com/ones-to-watch

#CNN1s2watch

Living Golf

‘Living Golf’ looks into the positive and negative aspects of being a pro heading into 2015.

‘Living Golf’ looks into the positive and negative aspects of being a pro heading into 2015.

Thursday 8 January at 1030 GMT/ 1130 CET and 1730 GMT/ 1830 CET

Saturday 10 January at 0730 GMT/ 0830 CET and 2230 GMT/ 2330 CET

Sunday 11 January at 1730 GMT/ 1830 CET

Saturday 17 January at 1730 GMT/ 1830 CET

Sunday 18 January at 0730 GMT/ 0830 CET and 2230 GMT/2330 CET

Duration: 30 minutes

The first ‘Living Golf’ of 2015 looks at the future of the game as it stands at a crossroads.

In the professional arena,  the game is as exciting as ever. While Tiger Woods may not be the dominant player he once was, his legacy has left a new breed of gifted young players coming to the fore, headed by Rory McIlroy, the new stand out star in the game.

Prize money and sponsorship is bigger than ever. The proof? 97 players won over a million dollars on the PGA Tour last year. But has increased prize money and endorsements reduced many a player’s desire to win? Or are they happy with a top 10 finish and a large cheque? ‘Living Golf’ looks into the positive and negative aspects of being a pro heading into 2015.

At grass roots level it’s a different story. While the game as a whole has grown around the world, the number of participating golfers in its traditional heartlands has fallen. The economic downturn a few years ago meant lifestyle choices had to be made and the sport, like many other pursuits, has felt the effect.

Golf also faces stiff competition from the digital world. Many believe the game is just too difficult for the younger generation nowadays. Do they prefer to play golf on a video game rather the real thing? ‘Living Golf’ looks into what is being done to try to reverse these trends. With contributions from a number of leading names in golf, including Jack Nicklaus and Arnold Palmer, the programme will analyse almost every aspect of the game. What makes golf so great, and what can still be improved?

@ShaneODonoghue

cnn.com/golf

The Art of Movement

Andris Nelsons, conductor of the Boston Symphony Orchestra, in action.

Andris Nelsons, conductor of the Boston Symphony Orchestra, in action.

Thursday 8 January at 0930 GMT/ 1030 CET

Friday 9 January at 0430 GMT/0530 CET

Saturday 10 January at 0530 GMT/ 0630 CET and 1630 GMT/1730 CET

Saturday 17 January at 1230 GMT/ 1330 CET

Sunday 18 January at 0530 GMT/ 0630 CET

Duration: 15 minutes

‘The Art of Movement’ is a monthly show on CNN that highlights the most significant innovations in science and technology helping shape the modern world.

In January, the programme explores the world of music and the way movement and gestures are used to create sound, first meeting Andris Nelsons, the 35 year old Latvian conductor of the Boston Symphony Orchestra, known for his energetic conducting style.

The movements and gestures of the conductor guide an orchestra to create beautiful music, and conductors train for years to master these fundamentals. French-American award-winning cellist Yo-Yo Ma, who began performing at five years old, explains the importance of a conductor’s energy to the viewers and how the movement and music comes together.

‘The Art of Movement’ also meets the Japanese band KAO=S, whose sound weaves traditional instruments together with a sword performance to create a different style of music.

The Grammy-nominated singer/musician Imogen Heap is featured, who created the Mi Mu Music gloves – a glove that makes music with the movement of an artist’s hands.

cnn.com/artofmovement

 

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